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Browsing the "World Resources Institute" Tag

Too Many Cities Are Growing Out Rather Than Up — 3 Reasons That’s A Problem

May 10th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Imagine Lagos, Nigeria, a city of 22 million. What was once a small coastal town just a few decades ago has exploded into a sprawling megacity spanning 452 square miles. Its rapid growth has stretched the city’s services impossibly thin: Less than 10 percent of people live in homes with sewer connections; less than 20 percent have access to tap water. Many houses are in slums and informal settlements at the city’s periphery. Now picture Lagos twice as big


Which Countries Use The Most Fossil Fuels?

May 3rd, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Originally published on WRI’s Resource Watch platform, a platform which features hundreds of data sets all in one place on the state of the planet’s resources and citizens


Urban Transformations: In Medellín, Metrocable Connects People In More Ways Than One

April 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Medellín, Colombia used to be the murder capital of the world. With the explosion of the global drug trade in the 1980s, crime burgeoned, plunging the city into a state of lawlessness. Slum communities, stacked up along the perilous slopes of the surrounding Aburrá Valley, were on the front lines of the violence and mayhem.But today, Medellín is transformed


Urban Transformations: In Pune, India, Waste Pickers Go from Trash to Treasure

April 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Pinky Sonawane spent her childhood gathering garbage on the streets of Pune, India. She’d join her mother in pulling plastic bottles, cans, and cardboard from roadside dumpsters, selling the materials to scrap traders for income. With no organized waste-collection system in the city of 4 million people, there was plenty of waste for her to pick—it filled bins, littered streets and piled up in mountainous heaps in dumps. But Sonawane and others like her were often treated like the garbage they collected


Urban Transformations: In Durban, Informal Workers Design Marketplaces Instead of Getting Displaced by Them

April 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

The story of how Warwick Junction bucked the global trend of replacing informal markets with malls and shopping centers is a testament to the compromise, conflict, and resourcefulness of a small set of actors – informal workers, local officials and the small non-profit Asiye eTafuleni (Zulu for “bring it to the table”). It is a story of social healing and the enduring contradictions of a modern African city


5 Cities Show What Urban Transformation Looks Like

December 29th, 2018 | by World Resources Institute

The WRI Ross Prize for Cities aims to spotlight exemplary real-world examples of urban transformation to help inspire better cities for all. Nearly 200 projects around the globe submitted applications for the inaugural $250,000 prize


China × Cleantech — August

September 28th, 2018 | by Tim Dixon

The world is changing fast, but many worry it is not fast enough, so let's review the biggest cleantech news from China in August. As always, there’s much news out of China. In order to aggregate and summarize the highlights, this edition of our China × Cleantech feature separates the stories by a handful of broad topics. This report is also published over on the “Future Trends” section of our website


IKEA Sets Science-Based GHG Emissions Targets

June 15th, 2018 | by Joshua S Hill

Global furniture giant IKEA Group has announced new greenhouse gas emission reduction targets this week that have been approved by the Science Based Targets initiative and will ensure the company's goal of contributing to reaching the targets set out under the Paris Climate Agreement. 


Increasing Renewable Energy In India Can Reduce Emissions, Water Use, & Supply Risk

January 16th, 2018 | by Joshua S Hill

Increasing the share of renewable energy sources in India's electricity mix and implementing changes in cooling technologies for thermal power plants could serve not only to reduce the country's carbon emissions intensity, but could also substantially reduce water consumption, mitigating or outright eliminating electricity supply risk due to water shortages. 



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