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About World Resources Institute

World Resources Institute is a global research organization that spans more than 50 countries, with offices in Brazil, China, Europe, India, Indonesia, and the United States. Our more than 450 experts and staff work closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources—the foundation of economic opportunity and human well-being. Find out more at www.wri.org



Author Archives: World Resources Institute

4 US States Scoring Under-the-Radar Clean Energy Wins

May 25th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

In the United States, the falling cost of renewable energy means the economic case for investing in renewables is stronger than ever before. Across the country, from South Carolina to Nevada, states are taking new measures to harness wind and solar power. Since January, more than 10 state legislatures have enacted policies that encourage new renewable energy development


Yes, The International Monetary Fund Is Waking Up To Financial Risks Of The Climate Crisis

May 12th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

It’s a sign of the times that even the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is exploring ways in which it can help address the climate crisis. Building on two new IMF papers released last week and Managing Director Christine Lagarde’s eight years of leadership, this mainstay of traditional economic thought is lending its voice and unique mandate to the cause of tackling climate change


Is Your City Really Serious About Road Safety? Look For These 3 Things

May 12th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Thirty-six people died in traffic crashes in Washington, D.C., last year, a 20% increase from 2017. Eight people, six of whom were walking or biking, have already been killed this year, prompting a major public rally just two weeks ago. Residents are angry that the city isn’t succeeding in curbing road deaths, despite the fact that Mayor Muriel Bowser committed to end traffic fatalities entirely by


Too Many Cities Are Growing Out Rather Than Up — 3 Reasons That’s A Problem

May 10th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Imagine Lagos, Nigeria, a city of 22 million. What was once a small coastal town just a few decades ago has exploded into a sprawling megacity spanning 452 square miles. Its rapid growth has stretched the city’s services impossibly thin: Less than 10 percent of people live in homes with sewer connections; less than 20 percent have access to tap water. Many houses are in slums and informal settlements at the city’s periphery. Now picture Lagos twice as big


Which U.S. Counties Are Struck By Hurricanes Most Frequently?

May 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

It's creeping towards that time of year for Eastern and Gulf states in the U.S. to prepare for hurricane season. Having lived through many Florida hurricanes, experiencing the water (everywhere) and the wind clearing out stagnant energy, the atmosphere is refreshing — if houses remain and people are fine. Electricity can be knocked out for hours or days, which can be stressful but can also be relaxing. It depends on your situation, your needs, and your point of view


The State Of The World’s Water — 7 Graphics

May 6th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Every person on Earth should have access to reliable water supplies. Water is essential for sanitation, hygiene, and daily survival, but in some places, conflict over water is becoming more commonplace.To recognize the importance of water for everything we do, we compiled seven graphics that explain the state of the world’s vital water resources


Scooter Use Skyrocketing In Cities, But Are They Safe? A Look At The Evidence

May 5th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Electric scooters are the latest "new mobility" tech to disrupt the transportation sector. Chances are you've seen someone passing by on one of these small-but-nimble two-wheelers in a city near you. Following the explosive growth of bike-sharing and ride-hailing, scooters reached 38.5 million U.S. trips in


There Were 137 Oil Spills In The U.S. In 2018 — See Where They Happened

May 5th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Oil spills don’t make the news very often unless they are big, like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill, which killed 11 people and spewed an estimated 205 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. But spills happen frequently. According to data from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), there were 137 oil spills in 2018, about 11 per month


Which Countries Use The Most Fossil Fuels?

May 3rd, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Originally published on WRI’s Resource Watch platform, a platform which features hundreds of data sets all in one place on the state of the planet’s resources and citizens


6 Signs Of Hope For The Ocean

May 2nd, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

It’s easy to lose sight of good news amid the barrage of negative stories about the threats facing the ocean—everything from growing plastic pollution to dying coral reefs. However, there is a lot to celebrate when you look more closely at ocean-related developments


The World Lost A Belgium-Sized Area Of Primary Rainforests Last Year

April 25th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

The tropics lost 12 million hectares of tree cover in 2018, the fourth-highest annual loss since record-keeping began in 2001. Of greatest concern is the disappearance of 3.6 million hectares of primary rainforest, an area the size of Belgium. The figures come from updated data from the University of Maryland, released today on Global Forest Watch


Urban Transformations: In Medellín, Metrocable Connects People In More Ways Than One

April 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Medellín, Colombia used to be the murder capital of the world. With the explosion of the global drug trade in the 1980s, crime burgeoned, plunging the city into a state of lawlessness. Slum communities, stacked up along the perilous slopes of the surrounding Aburrá Valley, were on the front lines of the violence and mayhem.But today, Medellín is transformed



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