#1 cleantech news, reviews, & analysis site in world. Support our work today. The future is now.


Browsing the "Dyson" Tag

Why Dyson Is So Well Positioned For The Electric Car Space

November 9th, 2018 | by Guest Contributor

Over the past few years, it has become known and acknowledged that Dyson is planning to enter the electric car arena with what it describes as innovative, forward-thinking products that will rethink and refashion ground transportation both technologically and in terms of aesthetics


Is Dyson’s Plan To Produce Electric Cars In Singapore Smart?

November 7th, 2018 | by Jo Borrás

British ultra-millionaire James Dyson recently confirmed rumors when he announced that he’d be taking his electric motor expertise to the electric vehicle market last year. When he did, the assumption was that he’d be building the cars somewhere in the UK — but that’s not what’s happening. Dyson will be building his electric car in Singapore


Batteries by Land, Sea or Air! (Cleantech Talk #35)

October 9th, 2017 | by Matthew Klippenstein

Though cars get most of the attention, batteries will participate in our cleantech energy transition on land, in the air and by sea. And in today’s Cleantech Talk, we cover them all. It’s something of a “double-cheeseburger” episode, in that we stretched ourselves around four topics instead of the usual two. Let us know in the comments if you liked the format, and if you have a few minutes, please leave us an iTunes review to make it easier for like-minded folks to find us!


UPDATED: Sakti3 & Dyson Still Rolling

April 4th, 2017 | by Steve Hanley

Just 18 months ago, Dyson, the British maker of bladeless fans and ridiculously expensive vacuum cleaners, shelled out $90 million to acquire Sakti3, a super secretive battery company based on patents held by the University of Michigan. Sakti3 claimed years ago that it had developed a solid-state lithium battery that is less expensive than a conventional lithium-ion battery and has double the power density. It also won't explode or burst into flames the way a conventional battery can. (See: Samsung Galaxy Note 7.) However, none of its claims have ever been proven publicly in the real world and the company has been reluctant to allow outsiders to independently validate its technology. The Dyson Sakti3 battery deal has now been abandoned, says a report in Quartz



Back to Top ↑