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Published on November 29th, 2020 | by Zachary Shahan

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ŠKODA ENYAQ IV (Close Cousin To Volkswagen ID.4) Goes Into Production

November 29th, 2020 by  


The ŠKODA ENYAQ IV, which has much of the same DNA (i.e., brains and heart) as the Volkswagen ID.4, is now in series production in the Czech Republic.

ŠKODA’s Mladá Boleslav factory has undergone a €32 million conversion in order to produce this mass market electric SUV.

At a max production capacity of 350 units per day, ŠKODA could produce nearly 130,000 ENYAQs a year (in theory). To put that into a little perspective, the ENYAQ IV would have been the 2nd best selling electric vehicle in the world in 2019 if ŠKODA had produced that many units of the vehicle. Of course, with rapid electric vehicle sales growth in Europe, the competition is getting sharper, but 350 units a day is still a solid amount.

The ENYAQ IV shares a production line with the non-electric OCTAVIA and KAROQ series in the Mladá Boleslav factory. Using Volkswagen Group’s Modular Electrification Toolkit (MEB), the ENYAQ IV is basically ŠKODA’s foray into serious electric vehicle development. Production began this week, on November 25.

“At its headquarters in Mladá Boleslav, ŠKODA has invested 32 million euros in the conversion work required to enable both MEB and MQB models to be produced on the same line. In future, the brand will be manufacturing up to 350 units of the ENYAQ iV here every day in a fully flexible manner alongside the OCTAVIA and KAROQ series,” ŠKODA writes.

“The car manufacturer adapted the building’s statics and designed the technologies for transporting parts to accommodate the weight of the fully battery-electric vehicles and the installed components. In addition, ŠKODA has introduced safety measures in the area of battery handling, for example, by installing thermal imaging cameras. These monitor the temperature in the workshop around the clock and trigger an alarm if any deviation is detected.”

We covered the ŠKODA ENYAQ IV in early September when it launched. Here are some key specs and notes from that earlier coverage:

There are 5 trims for the ENYAQ. Across those, you have 4 different range ratings (WLTP), 5 different performance levels, 5 different charging rates.

The shortest range rating, on the ENYAQ 50 iV, is 340 km (211 miles), while the longest, on the ENYAQ 80 iV, is 510 km (317 miles).

The cheapest trim, the ENYAQ 50 iV, has a max power output of 109 kW, while the top end ENYAQ RS iV has a max output of 225 kW.  The peak DC charging power levels scale with the battery pack sizes; the base 55 kWh variant can handle 50 kW charging, the 62 kWh can take 100 kW, and the largest 82 kWh packs can load at 125 kW.

The MyŠKODA Powerpass also helps with charging across Europe by including many of the many charging station networks under one umbrella.

Pricing will start at around €35,000, but the exact price depends on the country, and it can of course climb several thousand euros if you go up the trim ladder or add extra features.

All images courtesy of ŠKODA.

Related: ŠKODA ENYAQ iV Excites 
 


 


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About the Author

is tryin' to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director, chief editor, and CEO. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada, and Curaçao. Zach has long-term investments in NIO [NIO], Tesla [TSLA], and Xpeng [XPEV]. But he does not offer (explicitly or implicitly) investment advice of any sort.



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