#1 cleantech news, reviews, & analysis site in world. Support our work today. The future is now.


Browsing the "urban planning" Tag

Report: Cities Designed To Shape & Enable New Mobility

May 20th, 2019 | by Rocky Mountain Institute

Urban areas that are designed to shape and enable new mobility — by rethinking streets, parking, and more — can lower emissions, enhance health, and improve equity. Experimentation is key to best realize the potential of new mobility while avoiding negative and unintended consequences. Rocky Mountain Institute’s (RMI’s) recent report, Cities Designed to Shape and Enable New Mobility, describes the concept of MOD Cities — living test sites where local municipal governments, developers, financiers, vehicle manufacturers, mobility service providers, and urban designers and architects actively collaborate to co-innovate at the nexus of urban design, vehicles, and new mobility services. MOD Cities would put people first and be seamlessly integrated with the communities and urban fabric at their edges


Is Your City Really Serious About Road Safety? Look For These 3 Things

May 12th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Thirty-six people died in traffic crashes in Washington, D.C., last year, a 20% increase from 2017. Eight people, six of whom were walking or biking, have already been killed this year, prompting a major public rally just two weeks ago. Residents are angry that the city isn’t succeeding in curbing road deaths, despite the fact that Mayor Muriel Bowser committed to end traffic fatalities entirely by


Too Many Cities Are Growing Out Rather Than Up — 3 Reasons That’s A Problem

May 10th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Imagine Lagos, Nigeria, a city of 22 million. What was once a small coastal town just a few decades ago has exploded into a sprawling megacity spanning 452 square miles. Its rapid growth has stretched the city’s services impossibly thin: Less than 10 percent of people live in homes with sewer connections; less than 20 percent have access to tap water. Many houses are in slums and informal settlements at the city’s periphery. Now picture Lagos twice as big


Scooter Use Skyrocketing In Cities, But Are They Safe? A Look At The Evidence

May 5th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Electric scooters are the latest "new mobility" tech to disrupt the transportation sector. Chances are you've seen someone passing by on one of these small-but-nimble two-wheelers in a city near you. Following the explosive growth of bike-sharing and ride-hailing, scooters reached 38.5 million U.S. trips in


Urban Transformations: In Medellín, Metrocable Connects People In More Ways Than One

April 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Medellín, Colombia used to be the murder capital of the world. With the explosion of the global drug trade in the 1980s, crime burgeoned, plunging the city into a state of lawlessness. Slum communities, stacked up along the perilous slopes of the surrounding Aburrá Valley, were on the front lines of the violence and mayhem.But today, Medellín is transformed


Urban Transformations: In Durban, Informal Workers Design Marketplaces Instead of Getting Displaced by Them

April 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

The story of how Warwick Junction bucked the global trend of replacing informal markets with malls and shopping centers is a testament to the compromise, conflict, and resourcefulness of a small set of actors – informal workers, local officials and the small non-profit Asiye eTafuleni (Zulu for “bring it to the table”). It is a story of social healing and the enduring contradictions of a modern African city


Corridors Of Safety: Urban Transformation In Tanzania’s Capital, Safer Children Mean Better Neighborhoods

April 6th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Chaos often reigns on the streets of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s capital. Minivans, cars and motorcycles careen along half-finished roads without markings, sidewalks, or traffic lights. Pedestrians walk single-file within reach of speeding vehicles. Groups of children in matching school uniforms hold hands as they linger at the road’s edge. They scan for breaks in traffic and dart across before the bell rings for the start of class. Every day, this journey puts their lives at risk


An Influx Of New Tech Is Changing How We See & Act On Pollution

December 10th, 2018 | by Sponsored Content

While there is exciting progress and promise as air sensors become cheaper and more available, a diverse coalition of industry, activists, policymakers and researchers is critical to ensuring that the data is reliable, accessible and most of all, actionable.


City Planning Rock Star Janette Sadik-Khan Talks Urban Planning Leadership — #CleanTechnica Interview

November 4th, 2018 | by Cynthia Shahan

Janette Sadik-Khan is a top rock star in the world of city planning. She led NYC's recent transportation transformations under Mayor Bloomberg. In the interview, Zachary Shahan, CleanTechnica's director and chief editor, returns to his roots as he interviews Janette Sadik-Khan and talks urban transport leadership. Zach's master's degree was in city and regional planning (from UNC-Chapel Hill). UNC–Chapel Hill was ranked the #1 grad school in the nation for his specialization the year he graduated. The pair, on the same page, were brought together by Autonomy


Electric Bicycle Fatalities & Injuries Are Rising

October 31st, 2018 | by Michael Barnard

Urban planners and traffic safety regulators are struggling to come to grips with electric bicycles. They offer tremendous advantages for urban mobility, they reduce congestion, they offload overloaded transit, every electric bicycle is arguably one less car on crowded city streets, and they don't pollute.


Is Elon Musk An Elitist Jerk?

December 18th, 2017 | by Steve Hanley

Elon Musk has some unkind things to say about the state of public transportation today. His remarks did not sit well with transportation engineers and urban planners.


Leveling The Playing Field Via “Parking Cash Out”

April 5th, 2017 | by Cynthia Shahan

Donald Shoup pointed out many years ago that if companies pay the costs of parking for their employees, a common fringe benefit (and an expensive one, at that), those employers are essentially giving “an invitation to drive to work alone.”



Back to Top ↑