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Browsing the "Water" Category

Which U.S. Counties Are Struck By Hurricanes Most Frequently?

May 7th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

It's creeping towards that time of year for Eastern and Gulf states in the U.S. to prepare for hurricane season. Having lived through many Florida hurricanes, experiencing the water (everywhere) and the wind clearing out stagnant energy, the atmosphere is refreshing — if houses remain and people are fine. Electricity can be knocked out for hours or days, which can be stressful but can also be relaxing. It depends on your situation, your needs, and your point of view


The State Of The World’s Water — 7 Graphics

May 6th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Every person on Earth should have access to reliable water supplies. Water is essential for sanitation, hygiene, and daily survival, but in some places, conflict over water is becoming more commonplace.To recognize the importance of water for everything we do, we compiled seven graphics that explain the state of the world’s vital water resources


There Were 137 Oil Spills In The U.S. In 2018 — See Where They Happened

May 5th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Oil spills don’t make the news very often unless they are big, like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill, which killed 11 people and spewed an estimated 205 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. But spills happen frequently. According to data from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), there were 137 oil spills in 2018, about 11 per month


Which Countries Use The Most Fossil Fuels?

May 3rd, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

Originally published on WRI’s Resource Watch platform, a platform which features hundreds of data sets all in one place on the state of the planet’s resources and citizens


6 Signs Of Hope For The Ocean

May 2nd, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

It’s easy to lose sight of good news amid the barrage of negative stories about the threats facing the ocean—everything from growing plastic pollution to dying coral reefs. However, there is a lot to celebrate when you look more closely at ocean-related developments


Zero Mass Water Brings Clean Water To Puerto Rico Using Nothing But Sunshine

April 10th, 2019 | by Kyle Field

Zero Mass Water's Source Hydropanels harness the power of the sun and use it to produce from thin air. It's known as atmospheric water generation, and the fact that Zero Mass Water's panels are able to produce pure drinking water without the need for any external electricity makes them perfect for off-grid and disaster response scenarios around the world


Watergen’s Atmospheric Water Generators Pull Water From Thin Air

February 14th, 2019 | by Kyle Field

Watergen has developed a product that it believes will play a critical role in the struggle to find clean water today and on into the future with its atmospheric water generator (AWG). The company has developed not one, not two, but four applications derived from its AWG. CleanTechnica connected with Watergen's VP of Marketing and Sales, Michael Rutman, to talk about the company's newest product, the Genny, a residential atmospheric water generator


7 Environment & Development Stories To Watch In 2019

January 14th, 2019 | by World Resources Institute

One hundred years ago, 1919 was a really big year: Countries signed the Treaty of Versailles to end World War I, Mahatma Gandhi began his nonviolent resistance against British rule, the Grand Canyon became a national park. And on a lighter note, pop-up toasters entered kitchens for the first time!


Zero Mass Water’s Hydropanels Pull Water From Thin Air At #CES2019

January 11th, 2019 | by Kyle Field

Zero Mass Water and its Source hydropanels that literally create perfectly balanced drinking water from the air have been on our radar for a long time, so we were excited for the opportunity to connect with its CEO, Cody Friesen, at CES 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada to talk about their panels



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