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Published on October 15th, 2019 | by Cynthia Shahan

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The Irish Are Motoring Greener & Cleaner: Electric & Hybrid Vehicles Now Account For Over 10% Of Irish Auto Sales

October 15th, 2019 by  


Not so far from other countries CleanTechnica follows closely, comes Ireland. Green motoring is on the increase month by month in Northern Europe, as we’ve reported extensively. We are now happy to bring a report on the continuing growth of electric vehicles in Ireland. Yes, the Irish are getting greener each year, too.

The Irish Times reports that, although Ireland has seen a more moderate growth of electric and hybrid vehicles than countries like Norway and Sweden, this year brings good news. Together, hybrid and fully electric vehicles have seen their market share rise above 10 percent of car sales in the Republic.

Central Statistics Office (CSO) figures show sales of electric vehicles rose by 157% to 2,904 this year, accounting for 2.7% of the country’s sales.

Eoin Burke-Kennedy continues for The Irish Times, “The figures show electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid vehicles accounted for 10.5 per cent (19,718) of all private cars for which motor tax was paid for the first time in the Republic during up to the end of September.

“(CSO) figures show 107,686 new private cars were taxed for the first time, a decrease of 7.1 per cent compared with the same period last year. … This compared with 6.7 per cent for the same period last year and reflects the gradual shift to greener motoring.”

Looking at the PlugShare map for Ireland, I don’t think any modern EV will have much of an issue with “range anxiety.” Also, remember that you can also plug in with a slow charging cord at a normal electricity outlet.

Looking at this cropped PlugShare map of electric car chargers in Ireland, I would not have a worry in the world driving an EV in Ireland.

Furthermore, charging is easy for many simply when you go shopping. Nora Manthey for Electrive.com reported last August that the infrastructure was building rapidly in these convenient locations. Popular grocery store chain Lidl introduced electric car charging points at its new stores, for example. This helps people to see how easy charging can be. The grocery chain has provided more than 40 electric vehicle charging facilities across Ireland.

Along with convenience, the pocketbook appreciates the charging lifestyle. Instead of paying a lot at the pump, the charging service at Lidl is free of charge for customers while they shop. We see a similar approach here in North Carolina at Ingles Market and Food Co-op stores, and it seems such options are common at Whole Foods and Earthfare stores in the US Southeast as well. It appears this is becoming a global trend.

Free charging at a grocery store while you shop. Only home or workplace charging is more convenient. Photo by Cynthia Shahan | CleanTechnica.

The Independent also shared the Lidl story, which involves over €150,000 being invested in the company’s electric vehicle charging program, mentioning that the announcement was welcomed last year by the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland. “Initiatives such as this will help to provide confidence in the charging network and ensure that there are sufficient charging locations available for a growing number of electric vehicle users,” said Sustainable Energy Authority CEO Jim Gannon.

It’s true that 2.7% EV market share doesn’t compare to what is happening in the Netherlands or Norway, but the Netherlands was at that point in the adoption curve not too long ago. Burke-Kennedy adds: “the uptick in EV sales contrasts with the slump in the traditional car market. Motorists here have been taking advantage of the favorable exchange rate to buy used premium models in the UK over new models in the Republic.” 
 
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About the Author

Cynthia Shahan started writing by doing research as a social cultural and sometimes medical anthropology thinker. She studied and practiced both Waldorf education, and Montessori education. Eventually becoming an organic farmer, licensed AP, and mother of four unconditionally loving spirits, teachers, and environmentally conscious beings born with spiritual insights and ethics beyond this world. (She was able to advance more in this way led by her children.)



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