CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech news & analysis site in the world. Subscribe today!The future is now.


Cars

Published on July 15th, 2016 | by Zachary Shahan

10

10 Most Fuel Efficient Cars Are (Of Course) Electric Cars

July 15th, 2016 by  


Originally published on EV Obsession.

I just realized while writing “Auto Industry: ‘We Can’t Change, Please Let Us Keep Abusing You‘” that I never got to publishing a 2016 edition of “Most Fuel Efficient Cars In The USA,” to follow the very popular 2015 and 2014 posts.

As it turns out, not much has changed since 2015. Of course, electric cars still control the entire list. No car has topped the #1 BMW i3, nor knocked the #2 Chevy Spark EV off of the silver medal podium, nor displaced the #3 Volkswagen e-Golf from the bronze medal podium. In fact … no top 10 ranking has changed except for the Nissan LEAF (now #4) switching spots with the Fiat 500e (now tied for #5 with the Mitsubishi i-MiEV), due to a slight drop in the 500e’s efficiency from 116 MPGe to 112 MPGe.

Here are the 10 most fuel efficient cars in the United States in 2016 (so far):

BMW i3 Sarasota 1 copy

1. BMW i3 — 124 MPGe

2. Chevy Spark EV — 119 MPGe

3. Volkswagen e-Golf — 116 MPGe

4. Nissan LEAF114 MPGe

5. Fiat 500e — 112 MPGe

5. Mitsubishi i-MiEV — 112 MPGe

7. Smart Electric Drive — 107 MPGe & 107 MPGe

8. Kia Soul EV105 MPGe

8. Ford Focus Electric105 MPGe

10. Tesla Model S (75D) — 95 MPGe

Here are some more details on the electric cars currently for sale on the US market:

EVObsession.com EPA Efficiency Rating (MPGe) on Battery Electric-Only Range (EPA except when in km first) Price $ after US federal tax credit Seats Drivetrain
Tesla Model X (60D / 75D / 90D / P90D) 93 / 93 / 92 / 89 200 / 238 / 257 / 250 miles $74,000 / $83,000 / $95,000 / $115,500 $66,500 / $75,500 / $87,500 / $108,000 5–7 EV
Tesla Model S (60 / 75 / 90D / P90D) 103 / 103 / 103 / 95 210 / 249 / 294 / 270 miles $66,000 / $74,500 / $89,500 / 109,500 $58,500 / $67,000 / $82,000 / $102,000 5+2 EV
Chevy Spark EV 119 82 miles $27,495 $19,995 4 EV
Fiat 500e 116 87 miles $31,800 $24,800 4 EV
Honda Accord Plug-in 115 13 miles $39,780 $36,154 5 PHEV
Mitsubishi i-MiEV 112 62 miles $22,995 $15,495 4 EV
2nd-Gen Chevy Volt 106 53 $33,220 $25,720 5 PHEV
Kia Soul EV 105 93 miles $33,700 $26,200 5 EV
1st-Gen Chevy Volt 98 38 miles N/A N/A 4 PHEV
Ford Fusion Energi 88 21 miles $34,700 $30,693 5 PHEV
Ford C-Max Energi 88 21 miles $31,635 $27,885 5 PHEV
Cadillac ELR 82 37 miles $75,000 $67,500 4 PHEV
Audi A3 e-Tron 83 / 86 16/ 17 miles $37,900 $33,200 4 PHEV
BMW i3 124 81 miles $41,350 $33,850 4 EV
Volkswagen e-Golf 116 83 miles $35,445 $27,945 5 EV
Nissan LEAF 114 84 miles $29,010 $21,510 5 EV
Smart Electric Drive 107 68 miles $25,000 (or $19,990 + $80/Month Battery Rental) $17,500, or $12,490 + $80/month 2 EV
Ford Focus Electric 105 76 miles $29,170 $21,670 5 EV
Hyundai Sonata PHEV 99 27 miles $34,600 $29,681 5 PHEV
Toyota Prius PHEV 95 11 miles $29,990 $27,490 5 PHEV
Mercedes B250e 84 84 miles $41,450 $33,950 5 EV
BMW i8 76 15 miles $135,700 $131,907 5 PHEV
BMW 330e 72 14 miles $43,700 $38,999 5 PHEV
BYD e6 62 200 kilometers (122 miles) $52,000 5 EV
Mercedes S550e 58 14 miles $95,650 $91,607 5 PHEV
BMW X5 xDrive40e 56 14 miles $63,095 $58,427 5 PHEV
Volvo XC90 T8 54 14 miles $69,100 $64,500 7 PHEV
Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid 50 22 miles $99,000 $94,248 4 PHEV
Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid 47 14 miles $76,400 $71,064 5 PHEV
Mercedes-Benz GLE550e 43 12 miles $65,500 5 PHEV






Complete our 2017 CleanTechnica Reader Survey — have your opinions, preferences, and deepest wishes heard.

Check out our 93-page EV report, based on over 2,000 surveys collected from EV drivers in 49 of 50 US states, 26 European countries, and 9 Canadian provinces.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

is tryin' to help society help itself (and other species) with the power of the word. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director and chief editor, but he's also the president of Important Media and the director/founder of EV Obsession and Solar Love. Zach is recognized globally as a solar energy, electric car, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, and Canada. Zach has long-term investments in TSLA, FSLR, SPWR, SEDG, & ABB — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in these particular companies and feels like they are good cleantech companies to invest in. But he offers no professional investment advice and would rather not be responsible for you losing money, so don't jump to conclusions.



  • brunurb

    Why isn’t the volt in the top 10 list? The chart below has it at 106, which should place it as #8 unless I’m missing something?

    • Epicurus

      Good question.

  • Ivor O’Connor

    MPGe? Just say no.

    Instead break it out to gas and electricity.
    When running on gas include range at 80 mph.
    When running on electric include range at 80 mph.

    The automotive industry wants to hide these numbers and instead game the system for government kickbacks with “MPGe”.

    • Pluk

      Agreed, MPGe is silly.

      Plus, how is it possible that real world efficiency can be so far off:
      Real world Spark EV: 146 MPGe (average over 2 years, no hypermiling gimmics but good old LA rush hour traffic 40 miles roundtrip 5 days a week, 85% on freeways).
      Real world BMW I3 REX just barely gets the rated 117 MPGe in Eco mode (its only 33lbs heavier than the Spark). Go figure!
      Love everything about the Bimmer but Chevy really knows their sh** about efficient electric drive-trains.

    • neroden

      For BEVs, the correct rating is watt-hours per mile. (Or per km, if you’re outside the US.) The EPA does provide this number — both city and highway.

    • Radical Ignorant

      Fully agree. MPGe is so missleading. It’s always comparing well to wheels in electric vs engine to wheels in ICE vehicles.
      You need to add some side note which is easy to miss (especially with bad will) that it’s comparing full polittion to partial polution of IC vehicles. It’s just straightly unfair. And I’m sad that even here you use this one sided framing.
      MPG is miles per gallon of gasoline. Nobody thinks that car MPG is different than it’s MPGe because you need to add extracting and refining and transportation costs.

      • Ivor O’Connor

        To anybody with a bit of common sense ICE is dead. There is no debate. BEV is here to stay.

        These hybrid thingies going around claiming they get better MPGe than a pure BEV is criminal. Half the hybrids above can’t even do 25 miles before they cut over to ICE. However over half claim they get over 91 MPGe. So are their fossil fueled engines really capable of doing 67 mpg? Hell no. Otherwise they would be making ICE cars that got 67+ mpg but there are none. MPGe consists of lies, damn lies, and stats.

        Any rating that claims they get more MPGe than the range of their battery should result in billion dollar penalties to the companies.

        Lets start making this industry honest.

        • Ivor O’Connor

          Any hybrid with a small battery should obviously have an MPGe nearly the same as thei MPG rating. So damn obvious but it is not the case in most of the cars above. And since half these hybrids can not even do 25 miles on their batteries, or about half a gallons worth of ICE travel, their MPGe should be almost identical to their MPG. Something like 30 to 40 mpg. On the very high end should be pure BEVs that get close to 100 MPGe.

          This current rating system doesn’t pass the common sense test and should be scrapped.

        • Kraylin

          remember common sense is NOT common. You are severely overestimating EV’s ability to overtake the market or looked at another way you are severely underestimating the markets ability to resist change…

  • John Norris

    I think your LEAF numbers are for the 24 kWh version. The 30 kWh model gets 112 mpge with 107 mile range (EPA).

Back to Top ↑