Consumer Technology

Published on April 6th, 2014 | by Scott Cooney

11

Dual Flush Toilet Converter A Win

April 6th, 2014 by  

Editor’s Note: Living in Poland, I’ve got no need for a dual flush toilet converter — it seems that all toilets here are dual flush. However, I know many of you in the US aren’t so lucky. Our company’s owner & CEO recently tested out the TapNFlush dual flush toilet converter that he seems to loved. Check out the details in this Green Living Ideas repost:

Tap-n-flush logo CleanTechnica

Most of our readers know that we love to review cool eco-products. Recently, I had the pleasure of meeting Jeff Nasrallah, inventor of a water conservation device called the TapNFlush, a dual-flush converter for toilets. We installed a TapNFlush on the toilet in my house. Previously, I had a very low tech water saving device, a toilet tank insert from Niagara Conservation, but after seeing the TapNFlush video, I was very intrigued and wanted to see this puppy work up close and personal.

The TapNFlush is a converter for toilets, meaning that it’s hardware that you install on your existing toilet, rather than going out and buying a specific dual flush toilet. Here’s a picture of the hardware itself. This device is the “tap” part of TapNFlush. It sits on top of the back of the toilet and allows a user to tap its surface, where a little green light will pop on, and then it will automatically control the amount of water used in the flush.

Tap-n-flush toilet converter dual flush

Jeff and I sat down and talked about the state of the converter industry, and I guess I hadn’t realized what growing pains the industry has undergone. The top three selling products in this niche are heavy duty hardware items, hard to install, hard to remove, and even liable to cause leaks, rather than save water. It’s so bad, in fact, that 47% of the reviews on Amazon for one of the big 3 dual flush toilet converters were negative!

Nasrallah’s product is about 1/4 of the physical equipment of some of the other converters, and it’s a design that’s so simple and elegant that we had it installed on my toilet, and working, in literally about than a minute. According to Nasrallah, TapNFlush can save someone over $100 a year on their water bills. It’s easy to see how. After installing, I went ahead and made this quick video showing how much water was being saved with each flush.

One of the things that is so inherently beautiful about this product is that it’s fully adjustable. If you find that the amount of water being used to flush a #2 is just…not…quite…enough, well, just dial it up a notch (literally, I’m not kidding, there’s a dial and you can increase it to the next notch). If it’s enough and you think you could cut it down a bit, you can dial it down, until you find the Goldilocks levels for both liquid and solid flush. After installing and tweaking, my experience using the TapNFlush for the first 2 weeks is that we’re saving about 50% of the water the toilet would otherwise use on liquid flushes, and about 30% of the water it would normally use on solid flushes.

Conclusion: this is a great device. Simple to install, obvious benefits, quick payback. What’s not to love? So go to Amazon and get yours today!





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About the Author

Scott Cooney (twitter: scottcooney) is an adjunct professor of Sustainability in the MBA program at the University of Hawai'i, green business startup coach, author of Build a Green Small Business: Profitable Ways to Become an Ecopreneur (McGraw-Hill), and developer of the sustainability board game GBO Hawai'i. Scott has started, grown and sold two mission-driven businesses, failed miserably at a third, and is currently in his fourth. Scott's current company has three divisions: a sustainability blog network that includes the world's biggest clean energy website and reached over 5 million readers in December 2013 alone; Pono Home, a turnkey and franchiseable green home consulting service that won entrance into the clean tech incubator known as Energy Excelerator; and Cost of Solar, a solar lead generation service to connect interested homeowners and solar contractors. In his spare time, Scott surfs, plays ultimate frisbee and enjoys a good, long bike ride. Find Scott on



  • Pat Campbell

    Correct, but there are ways that other ladies have figured this out. Its . Still this handles over 50% of the immediate issue.
    Using treated water as a transportation vehicle is energy intensive, wasteful, and too expensive for most human communities.

  • Bob_Wallace

    Introducing the Little John “Lady J” Female Adapter.

    A girlfriend of mine used to use one of these to pee off the back of our sailboat. Beat going below in a pitching boat and making ones way to the head.

    • Gwennedd

      That would work! Wish I’d had one for all those fishing trips in a canoe with plenty of beer.

  • Pat Campbell

    Take a plastic jug you were going to recycle. Use it for urine which is sterile and can be reused as a fertilizer. Problem solved cheaper and possibly much better.

  • JamesWimberley

    This is news? I’m not particularly handy, but I’ve fitted dual-flush mechanisms for a decade. You can buy them in any hardware store.

    • aaron

      Its about a 1min install and requires no new parts for your toilet and is easy to use and is only $40. So yes, it is news.

      • Gwennedd

        Do you need to plug it into an electrical outlet? If so, that may prove to be a problem. There is often only one outlet in a bathroom and it’s near the counter.

        • aaron

          I actual thought the same thing, it requires 4 AA batteries and says they last up to 3 years.

          • Gwennedd

            Hmm..that would make sense. I”ll check them out if I can find some locally.

          • Scott Cooney

            Aaron’s right–it’s battery powered. I’m the author of the article and installed this device and love it. It’s literally saving 50% of water on liquid flushes and about 30% on solid flushes. It’s also fully customizable, so that if you’re not getting enough water in the solid flush, there’s a little dial on the device you can crank a little higher.

          • Gwennedd

            Thanks! Smart device, that. Will save water and renovation money.

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