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About Scott Cooney

Scott Cooney Scott Cooney (twitter: scottcooney) is a serial eco-entrepreneur hellbent on making the world a better place for all its residents. After starting and selling two mission driven companies, Scott started a third and lost his shirt. After that, he started this media company and was smart enough to hire someone smarter than him to run it. He then started a service that greens homes and a zero waste, organic, locally made personal care line. Scott's also addicted to producing stuff and teaching people--he was an adjunct professor of Sustainability in the MBA program at the University of Hawai'i, green business startup coach, author of Build a Green Small Business: Profitable Ways to Become an Ecopreneur (McGraw-Hill), and Green Living Ideas, and developer of the sustainability board game GBO Hawai'i.



Author Archives: Scott Cooney

Utility Adds 2.5 MW Of Demand Response Capabilities With Very Unusual “Batteries”

November 2nd, 2019 | by Scott Cooney

Hawaiian Electric (HECO) recently added 2.5MW of grid services to its grid, allowing it to store energy during peak solar and wind production periods, and did so without any traditional batteries, flywheels, or pumped hydro. Even better, the hardware required is very minimal, and in fact, most of it already exists in every residential grid in the world


Pushing Sustainability Through The Supply Chain — Our Experience

September 14th, 2019 | by Scott Cooney

Most of us want to live in a world without waste. The problem is, it's everywhere. Buy organic food? It's often wrapped in plastic. Produce? Bioplastic bags don't cut the mustard for some foodies (how did cut the mustard become an expression?). Order a pallet to buy in bulk? Guess what — stuff is effectively saran wrapped onto the pallet to keep it from sliding around. Turns out, plastic is useful


Can Amazon.com Save The Amazon?

August 25th, 2019 | by Scott Cooney

Climate anxiety is real. I’ve felt it for years — a sense that we’re demolishing the only planet we have, hurtling toward a cliff at unprecedented speed, and, for the most part, only a backseat driver is currently starting to murmur something along the lines of, “Hey, guys? Ummm … maybe we ought to … you know, I don’t want to nag or anything, but, maybe we oughta, ya know, slow down?” I know it’s real in others, too — I’ve seen a growing number of despair-oriented posts in my social media feeds. This week, it seems to have hit a fever pitch, with the Amazon rainforest on fire in a way that just seems different somehow


Clean Energy At 1 Cent Per Kilowatt-Hour

August 18th, 2019 | by Scott Cooney

We need clean energy, and we need it ASAP. There are barriers to getting it done, including permitting, price, land-use issues, energy-water nexus issues, lobbying efforts by the fossil industries and the puppets they install in our government, and more. Capital projects can take years to develop as a result of these obstacles


From The Founder’s Desk: The Business Of CleanTechnica

April 7th, 2019 | by Scott Cooney

Many regular readers turn to CleanTechnica as their #1 source of cleantech news. However, I'm guessing that most readers, regular or otherwise, don't give much thought beyond that. Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes here in our digital and globally dispersed offices? Or thought, "I wish CleanTechnica would do...."


Department of Hawaiian Homelands Energy Efficiency Project Kicks off

May 26th, 2017 | by Scott Cooney

The Department of Hawaiian Homelands (DHHL) owns 10,000 homes across the Hawaiian islands that it leases out on 99-year leases to residents of Hawaiian ancestry. It's part of the state's affordable housing initiatives, and it provides much needed relief from high cost of living for many Hawaiian people


Tuna From A Lab — Frankenfood, Or Disruptive Tech?

April 5th, 2017 | by Scott Cooney

The idea of laboratory grown meats is not new. Advocates of the technology funded a $330,000 lab grown hamburger to showcase that it could be done. The basic idea of lab-grown food is that stem cells from the actual animal species in question are used to create a substitute that is every bit as genetically real as its living, breathing cousin


3 Reasons Even Trump Supporters Should Love Sustainability

April 3rd, 2017 | by Scott Cooney

There's a lot of great news these days about innovations and projects that are moving our society forward toward a sustainable future. There's also a lot of bad news out there about the damage we are doing. Sustainability shouldn't be political, but let's face it, it is. While one (I, for instance) might argue that we all should want a world free of biologically hazardous chemicals and human-produced climate-altering gases, one (I) can also understand that, to get there, some people's economic interests will be, shall we say, not optimized. Change is never easy


4th World Nation-Building

March 5th, 2017 | by Scott Cooney

Sandra Kwak, founder of TenPower, gave a workshop at the Envision Festival in Costa Rica, discussing paths forward for global sustainable economic development, talking about creating a “4th world” standard for developing nations


Profile Of Kailash Ecovillage, An Urban Intentional Community In Portland Oregon

January 3rd, 2017 | by Scott Cooney

The Kailash Ecovillage journey began nearly a decade ago when founders Ole and Maitri Ersson bought a rundown apartment complex in inner Southeast Portland, OR. Since then, the couple along with a plethora of residents, gardeners, builders, and driven community members have created a functional, beautiful, and highly livable intentional community in one of the most walkable cities in the


Espin E-Bike Review: Pedal-Assisted Awesomeness

December 16th, 2016 | by Scott Cooney

Recently, we were contacted by Espin, an e-bike company making an innovative pedal assist bike, to do a review of its newest product. The company asked me to do a review and lent me a bike for two weeks, which I gladly used for my daily commute in hilly San Francisco



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