Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Clean Power

70 MW Geothermal Plant Approved For Nevada

The 70-megawatt New York Canyon Geothermal Project has been approved recently as reported on the Dept. of the Interior website. (Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewel made the announcement.) ‘Today’s approvals will help bolster rural economies by generating good jobs and reliable power and advance our national energy security,’ she explained. Since 2009, the DOI has approved 11 geothermal plants.

Image Credit: Famartin

Image Credit: Famartin

The site for the new geothermal plant will be 25 miles east of Lovelock, Nevada in Pershing County. About 150 jobs will be created when construction is in full gear. When completed, the plant will employ about 16 people in full or part-time positions.

The land that will be used by the project is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. A BLM fact sheet for the project says the plant will be able to power about 60,000 homes. One big advantage of geothermal over other alternative energy forms is that it is constant. In other words, wind and solar are intermittent, depending on weather conditions, but geothermal plants produce energy at the same levels constantly.

An advantage of this particular geothermal project is that no endangered or threatened species were found to be living in the immediate area where the construction will take place. This is an important fact, because in some cases involving solar technology installations, local wildlife impacts were significant enough to be controversial, and even require much better planning for the sake of ecological sensitivity. It makes no sense to install a more environmentally-friendly energy plant, while destroying or damaging the local habitats it resides within.

An electrical transmission facility and 230 kilo-volt electrical line will also be installed at the site. The plant’s developer is TGP Dixie Development Company, LLC, a subsidiary of TerraGen Power, LLC.

While some may not be impressed by a plant that is 70 MW, these kinds of projects are setting an important precedent, because their success neutralizes the people who say alternative energy is only a marginal technology. In other words, once this plant is providing reliable electricity to tens of thousands of Nevadans, there will no longer be any rational argument to made against it. Also, the costs of such plants will decrease as more and more are built. Lastly, they also serve as educational experiences, meaning engineers, planners and construction workers are all learning while they are on the job, and creating more insights they can apply to the next plant.

 
Check out our brand new E-Bike Guide. If you're curious about electric bikes, this is the best place to start your e-mobility journey!
 
 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Advertisement
 
Written By

Hello, I have been writing online for some time, and enjoy the outdoors. If you like, you can follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JakeRsol

Comments

You May Also Like

Cars

Tesla Insurance has expanded to Nevada, making it the ninth state to get Tesla’s in-house insurance program. There were reports that Florida and Maryland...

Buildings

Yotta Energy, headquartered in Austin, Texas, was founded by Omeed Badkoobeh and Vikram Iyengar in 2017. The company makes PV solar panel-level energy storage,...

Batteries

Tesla’s giant solar and energy facility near Las Vegas will power 60,000 homes with its 528,084 solar panels and 90 MW/360 MWh Tesla Megapack....

Clean Transport

CARSON CITY, NV — Yesterday morning, Governor Sisolak announced he has signed a memorandum of understanding committing Nevada to work collaboratively to advance and...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.