Bicycles

Published on March 17th, 2013 | by Zachary Shahan

2

World Bike-Sharing Programs (Map)

March 17th, 2013 by  

Reposted from Bikocity:

This is sweet. An excellent compilation of existing, planned, or under construction bike-sharing programs around the world. It was put together by the bike-sharing-obsessed people over at the The Bike-sharing Blog, which is a product of Paul DeMaio / MetroBike, LLC and Russell Meddin. The map includes 2nd- and 3rd-generation bike-sharing programs (sorry, 1st-generationers). Check out the map, and jump down below it for some of my takeaway comments.


View The Bike-sharing World Map in a larger map

As you can see if you look closely, the U.S. has a lot of bike-sharing programs… planned or under construction. Not so many in place today. But hey, who’s counting (other than Russell Meddin and Paul DeMaio). The most notable U.S. bike-sharing systems are probably the New York, Boston, and D.C. systems.

Europe, meanwhile, has a bazillion bike-sharing programs in place today. OK, maybe not a bazillion, but a lot. It also has a decent number of once-living-but-now-defunct programs, another sign of the more mature level of bike-sharing in Europe.


 
And then there’s China and Japan, which also have a large number of programs, as well as several planned. I’ll also note that China has at least one or two ginormous programs. For example, the Hangzhou, China bike sharing system (last I heard) has 50,000 bikes at 2,050 stations. It is used for approximately 240,000 trips a day. By 2020, the system is supposed to include 175,000 bikes! Here’s a video on the Hangzhou system from Streetfilms:

Of course, there are a few other bike-sharing programs in other locations, but those three regions certainly lead the show — not very surprising, given the high(ish) level of investment needed to get these programs going, as well as the fact that they are particularly well suited for high-density cities. (Note: lest you get confused, there are no programs, no planned or under construction programs, and no defunct programs in the Southern Ocean — that’s just the legend.)

I’m happy to say that I use the Wrocław, Poland bike-sharing program regularly (well, not in winter — the bikes are removed in winter). I’ve seen Barcelona’s bicing program — very nice one. And I’ve seen a few other, smaller ones. Have you seen or used any?

Related posts on CleanTechnica:

  1. Mayor Of London Has £913 Million Cycling Infrastructure Plan
  2. 36 U.S. Cities Ranked On Their Bikeability
  3. Progress In The Big Apple — NYC Mayor Bloomberg Targets 1/3 Electric Taxi Fleet By 2020; Largest Bike Share In Country
  4. Chattanooga Bike-Sharing Pilot Program A Big Success
  5. Bicycles — Cleantech?


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About the Author

is tryin' to help society help itself (and other species) with the power of the typed word. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director and chief editor, but he's also the president of Important Media and the director/founder of EV Obsession, Solar Love, and Bikocity. Zach is recognized globally as a solar energy, electric car, and energy storage expert. Zach has long-term investments in TSLA, FSLR, SPWR, SEDG, & ABB — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in these particular companies and feels like they are good cleantech companies to invest in.



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  • wattleberry

    In much of Spain and Europe generally the mainly pre- modern roads and streets are too narrow to mix traffic so the bike schemes we have entail too much risk until dedicated tracks are provided.

    China’s newer streets are much broader to accommodate 2 and 3 wheelers on mostly segregated siderides; pedestrians take their chances and negotiatimg junctions is definitely an art-form! Battery bikes,scooters and tik-taks are common but I don’t know if they’re rented as well.

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