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Clean Transport Image Credit: BMW

Published on April 29th, 2014 | by James Ayre

17

BMW Begins Series Production Of C Evolution Electric Scooter At Berlin Plant

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April 29th, 2014 by
 

Originally published on EV Obsession.

Series production of BMW’s battery-electric BMW C evolution maxi-scooter has now begun at the company’s Berlin plant. The electric scooter — which is BMW’s first to be mass produced — began development back in 2011, as the BMW E-Scooter concept.

The storage modules used in the BMW C Evolution are, interestingly, the same as those used in the i3 — as such, these will be supplied by BMW’s plant in Dingolfing.

bmw c evolution electric scooter

Image Credit: BMW

Speaking about the beginning of series production, Plant Manager Dr Marc Sielemann stated: “We are very proud to herald the launch of electric vehicles in the two-wheeler segment, the BMW Group here in Berlin. We anchor the topic of electric mobility production in Berlin BMW plant. In addition, the BMW C evolution fits perfectly into the activities of the showcase region for electric mobility Berlin-Brandenburg.”

The press release from BMW provides more:

The C evolution is powered by a drivetrain swing arm with liquid-cooled permanent magnet synchronous motor via a toothed belt and ring gearing. The rated power output is 11 kW (15 hp), with a peak output of 35 kW (47 hp). This enables the C evolution to achieve a top speed of 120 km/h (75 mph, electronically limited) and gives it better acceleration than some maxi-scooters powered by engines with displacements of 600 cc or more.

The 8 kWh air-cooled lithium-ion high-voltage battery allows the two-wheeler to cover a range of up to 100 kilometers (62 miles) before it needs to be charged from any domestic mains supply. When plugged in to a standard 220V domestic socket with a 12A charge current, recharging fully from empty takes around 4 hours (with 220V / 16A = 3 h).

Interesting take on an electric scooter. I’m not too convinced that it’ll be commercially successful, though. I guess that we’ll just have to wait and see. Not that long off now.

Image credit for images in gallery at top: Zachary Shahan / EV Obsession / CleanTechnica (CC BY-SA license)

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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • codymc

    When will it be available in the U.S.? Seems the perfect get around town vehicle.

  • http://fatcatwatch.wordpress.com FatCatWatch

    Love the potential for electric motorbikes – super cool. Will hopefully be within reach of many more people than the sometimes pricey, but still amazing, electric cars that are on the market :-)

  • http://electrobatics.wordpress.com/ arne-nl

    The running costs on this thing are next to zero. And fill up at home, what do you want more? A lower price. at 15k euros in The Netherlands, it is a bit costly.

    In Paris or Rome or other large cities where the motorcycle is a favourite intracity transportation device this will attract many buyers.

  • LookingForward

    “75 mph, electronically limited”
    It’s limites, it’s got the potential to go that fast. Overdrivers will love this thing :P

  • Benjamin Nead

    Since I’ve never really been all that interested gasoline-powered scooters (Vespas, etc,) I don’t even know the price range. But if BMW can hit a price point near to what a consumer would expect to pay for a premium ICE scooter of comparable performance, they should do well.

    And, yeah . . . doesn’t a 75mph top speed kinda blur the conventional definitions of what would separate a scooter from a motorcycle?

    • No way

      Being a scooter is just about the design. It it loks like that with the small wheels, the rest where you can put your feet then it’s a scooter, no matter if it does 5 mph or 200 mph.(the designs I’m used to hear about are “the scooter”, “the cross” that looks like you can take it out into the terrain and forrest/mountain, “the sports bike” when you almost lie down and “the cruiser” á la Harley Davidson style)
      Being classified as an MC is always about the speed and the power of the bike and not about the design and looks of it.

  • Otis11

    Wouldn’t mind an electric motorcycle… if it were reasonably priced.

    Scooter is a more limited market imo.

    • No way

      40+ million electric scooters sold last year beg to differ. ;)

      • Doug Cutler

        Yah, good to see EV scooters getting some love around here.

        • Ronald Brakels

          Yes, in Australia I’m sure this thing would be classed as a motorcycle. But then, European electric bicycles are also classed as motorbikes here. I used to have a chap living behind me who would do illegal electric bike modifications including electrical shock anti-theft traps and knife holsters. Now perhaps our electric bike scene is a little rougher than in other countries, but I think we’re just seeing a generation of electric greasers coming up. Internal combustion cars are now too complex to do much with and the older cars that it used to be legal to modify have now either rusted away or become collector items that are too expensive for young people to buy. But electric bikes – they are affordable and simple enough for a backyard boy to do quite a bit with and our strict limits on how powerful they can be gives a lot of incentive to give them a boost, with no internal combustion engine roar to give away the fact that it’s been souped up.

          • Doug Cutler

            Anti-theft zapper sounds fun.

            Here in Canada, I ride a semi-recumbant pedal assist E-bike to work 8 months of the year. Kids love it but Harley guys just sneer. So now it might just give me a smile or two to think that in Oz we’d both be in the same vehicular category.

      • Otis11

        Good to know – I was not aware of such a large market.

        Where were those all sold?

        • No way

          Almost all of the market is in China. But Indonesia, Phillipines, Vietnam, Thailand and eventually India and Cambodia/Laos are growing and potential big markets.

          Do a google picture search on “traffic Ho Chi Minh” and you will see something interesting. It’s how the capital of Vietnam looks like. ;)

          • Otis11

            See, the problem I see though, is that most of those markets typically aren’t for the high end products I associate with BMW. Maybe that’s an incorrect assumption?

          • Bob_Wallace

            Obviously China has some people with very fat bank accounts.

            There are a lot of nice cars in Thailand. BMWs and Mercedes are quite common. There are enough people with good incomes and the cost of living is low enough that money gets spent on cars.

            Cambodia and Laos, not so much so. I just can’t recall what people were driving in Indonesia the last time I was there. But in many countries that we think of as not that well off often have their “1%”.

          • Otis11

            Oh, absolutely, and maybe it’s just my perception, but I see those that have the money to spend on a “luxury” EV scooter as getting a nice car instead…

          • No way

            I have no idea what the prices are on the high end of those markets and if BMW could sell any at all there :) But I have seen some nice ones both in Vietnam and China so I assume there is a top 1% or at least 0,1% who could do that price and that would be 40k – 400k bikes. But just assumptions, i have no facts about the market.

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