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Browsing the "electric utility" Tag

How Cities Can Fund Their 100% Renewable Ambitions

November 19th, 2018 | by John Farrell

We’re inspired by the passage of the Portland Clean Energy Initiative this week, a ballot measure that will now provide $30 million per year for the city’s clean energy and climate work. Even better, the funds will target local energy deployment that lifts up low-income folks and people of color with energy savings and solar energy, as well as jobs installing these cost-saving measures.


3 Forces Fighting Local Renewable Energy & 3 Ways To Fight Back

December 4th, 2017 | by John Farrell

Utility companies are undercutting state regulation with their legislative lobbyists. And utilities are also bringing their monopoly market power to bear in previously competitive markets. We’ll detail examples of each of these three disturbing trends, and ways to fight back


Competition & Freedom At Stake — Episode 37 Of Local Energy Rules Podcast

January 25th, 2017 | by John Farrell

Incentives designed to make rooftop solar feasible for a wider range of consumers are under attack nationwide, threatening new solar development as well as the consumers that already have rooftop panels. The staunchest opponents? Utilities which say, despite a growing body of research to the contrary, that rooftop solar hurts other ratepayers and their bottom lines


Community Solar Now Available Nationwide From Arcadia Power

December 8th, 2016 | by Susan Kraemer

For the first time, anyone with an electric bill can subscribe to nationwide community solar and get solar credits deducted from their utility bill. Arcadia Power has rolled out the first nationwide community solar plan, regardless of where your electricity comes from, and which utility provides it


Why Is Green Pricing A Premium When Wind Power Is Cheap?

November 15th, 2016 | by John Farrell

Ten years ago, a North Dakota cooperative stopped charging customers a premium for getting energy from the wind, because they found it wasn't costing anything extra. The cooperative, like many utilities, used a "green pricing" program that allowed customers to voluntarily pay more to get their energy solely from renewable resources



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