Author: Roy L Hales

EV Tipping Point in Norway

Prior to the introduction of supportive government policies, most battery electric vehicles (BEV) were in Oslo, Norway. In March 2014, one percent of the vehicles on the roads were electric, while 21% of new vehicle sales were plug-in vehicles. Five years later, in March 2019, 58.4% of new vehicle purchases were fully electric.

Kinder Morgan Sold The Pipeline

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau claims that buying the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline is acting in the national interest. Ben Parfait put his feeling about the $4.5 billion purchase to music: “Broken hands on broken ploughs, Broken treaties, broken vows, Broken pipes, broken tools/ People bending broken rules.” Economist Robyn Allan estimates Canadian taxpayers will spend $20 billion before the controversial pipeline expansion is finished; if it is finished. Is anyone surprised to hear that Kinder Morgan sold the pipeline?

BC Approves The Site C Dam

The BC Utilities Commission recently concluded that “increasingly viable alternative energy sources such as wind, geothermal and industrial curtailment could provide similar benefits to [BC Hydro] ratepayers as the Site C project, with an equal or lower Unit Energy Cost.” Nevertheless, today Premier John Horgan announced BC approves the Site C Dam.

The World Of Sustainable Competitiveness

What are the most important factors that make a nation thrive? What is more important: the welfare of a people or corporate interest? Will Donald Trump’s fossil-fueled America First policies plunge the world’s leading economy into mediocrity? Which nations are best poised to lead the world into a more sustainable future?

Renewables Provided 44.1% Of Germany’s Electricity In October

Germany added 2.3 gigawatts of new onshore wind capacity in the first half of 2017. Though it failed to meet the target last year, the Renewable Energy Act set an annual target of installing 2.5 gigawatts (GW) of new solar capacity. Add in a warm autumn and the winter storms Xavier and Herwart, and it is easy to see how renewables provided 44.1% of Germany’s electricity in October.