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One of the world's most recognizable shoe and sporting brands, Puma, has announced this week that it has set a target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 35% by 2030, a target which has been approved by the Science Based Target initiative (SBTi). 

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Puma Commits To 35% Reduction Of Its GHG Emissions By 2030

One of the world’s most recognizable shoe and sporting brands, Puma, has announced this week that it has set a target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 35% by 2030, a target which has been approved by the Science Based Target initiative (SBTi). 

One of the world’s most recognizable shoe and sporting brands, Puma, has announced this week that it has set a target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 35% by 2030, a target which has been approved by the Science Based Target initiative (SBTi).

Image Credit: Robert Ashcroft/ PUMA

The German-based multinational casual- and sporting-wear company announced on Tuesday that it had committed to reducing emissions from owned and operated facilities as well as its energy needs — its Scope 1 and 2 emissions — by 35% by 2030 based on a 2017 baseline. Puma will also aim to reduce its Scope 3 emissions by 60% per million-Euro in sales between 2017 and 2030.

“Recent scientific reports have highlighted the need for urgent action, as global warming is happening at a faster pace than previously anticipated,” said Stefan Seidel, PUMA’s Head of Corporate Sustainability. “That is why PUMA wants to be a part of the solution by setting a bold path towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

The company’s targets have been approved by the Science Based Target initiative, which serves to define and promote best-practices in science-based target setting, independent assessing and approving companies’ targets, and offering guidance and advance.

“We know that the fashion industry has a significant impact on the environment, but rapid growth in global apparel and footwear production shows no signs of slowing,” said Cynthia Cummis, Director of Private Sector Climate Mitigation at World Resources Institute (WRI), one of the SBTi partners. “We need more companies in the industry to follow PUMA’s lead and pursue comprehensive strategies to decarbonize and do their part to prevent catastrophic climate change.”

This brings the number of companies around the world working towards targets approved by the Science Based Target initiative up to 569, up from over 480 companies in September of 2018.

 
 
 
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