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Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy will likely supply approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) of offshore wind turbines for two French offshore wind farms being developed by Eolien Maritime France, taking over supply from GE Renewable Energy, which ceded an agreement that has been plagued by delays since 2012. 

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Siemens Gamesa Takes Over Nearly 1 Gigawatt Of Offshore Projects From GE

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy will likely supply approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) of offshore wind turbines for two French offshore wind farms being developed by Eolien Maritime France, taking over supply from GE Renewable Energy, which ceded an agreement that has been plagued by delays since 2012. 

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy will likely supply approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) of offshore wind turbines for two French offshore wind farms being developed by Eolien Maritime France, taking over supply from GE Renewable Energy, which ceded an agreement that has been plagued by delays since 2012.

Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy announced on Tuesday that it had signed a framework agreement with Eolien Maritime France (EMF) which will see the company supply and service approximately 1 GW worth of its SWT-7.0-154 DD offshore wind turbines for two of three offshore wind projects EMF is developing off the coasts of Courseulles-sur-Mer, Saint-Nazaire, and Fécamp, in France.

“We thank EMF and its shareholders for their trust,” said Markus Tacke, CEO of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy. “This agreement again confirms Siemens Gamesa’s position as leader of the offshore wind market in France and allows us to strengthen our medium-term prospects as part of the development of the industrial project in Le Havre. Siemens Gamesa remains fully committed to meeting the needs of all its customers and ensuring that these projects are a success for the sector and for France.”

GE Renewable Energy similarly announced on Tuesday that it was terminating its exclusive supplier status for the three projects, though it would remain preferred supplier for one of the three projects. Specifically, GE will supply and service its Haliade 150-6 MW turbines to the first French EMF offshore wind farm to be cleared of any legal recourse. All three of the projects are still awaiting final court decisions, following appears against the administrative authorizations required for their implementation.

GE Renewable Energy first signed its exclusivity agreement all the way back in 2012. Unsurprisingly, the financial characteristics of these projects have shifted dramatically in that time for GE, leading to the company’s decision to review its engagement in the development of the three projects.

 

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