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Corvus Energy, the largest supplier of energy storage systems for ships, has been selected to power 5 new all electric ferries for Fjord 1, Norway's largest ferry operator.

Batteries

Corvus Energy Tapped To Power 5 More Electric Ferries In Norway

Corvus Energy, the largest supplier of energy storage systems for ships, has been selected to power 5 new all electric ferries for Fjord 1, Norway’s largest ferry operator.

Corvus Energy has been selected by Norwegian ferry operator Fjord 1 to supply lithium-ion energy storage systems for 5 new all electric ferries. The new ships are being built by Havyard shipbuilders and are expected to enter service in January of 2020. Fjord 1 already has 8 electric ferries operating on four routes. In all, Corvus Energy has supplied energy storage systems for 40 short range hybrid and electric vessels worldwide.

Corvus Energy electric ferry

Corvus Energy battery systems provide power to hybrid and all electric heavy industrial equipment as well as ferries and other vessels. To date, it has supplied over 200 MWh of battery storage to industry. Its battery storage systems have successfully accumulated over 2 million operating hours.

It recently was selected to supply battery storage systems to Scandlines, one of the largest cargo and passenger ferry operators in Scandinavia. That contract will span the next decade and is one of the primary reasons Corvus Energy is constructing a new battery manufacturing facility in Bergen, Norway.

Fjord 1 has been the successful bidder on a number of  contracts that specify low and zero emissions marine transportation. The Norwegian government is intent on lowering emissions from its extensive fleet of passenger and cargo ferries which are a vital link in the country’s transportation network.

The new Havyard 932 ferries will be 67 meters long and carry up to 50 cars. Each will be equipped with an air cooled Corvus Orca energy storage system that will supply all of the ferries’ electrical needs in addition to the electric motors used to propel them.

Geir Bjørkeli, CEO of Corvus Energy, tells CleanTechnica in an email, “There is an electric revolution going on in the maritime sector, and we want to deliver the best solutions in the industry. The strategic locations of our R&D and production facilities will enable us to quickly test and develop new systems that can meet the future needs of the industry. Further, by switching from manual processing to automated production, we will increase production capacity and remain price-competitive.” Corvus also has corporate offices and battery production facilities in Canada.

 
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Steve writes about the interface between technology and sustainability from his homes in Florida and Connecticut or anywhere else the Singularity may lead him. You can follow him on Twitter but not on any social media platforms run by evil overlords like Facebook.

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