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Published on January 5th, 2019 | by Karel Beckman

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Dutch EV Sales: Tripled In 2018, 30% Market Share In December, Tesla Model S Took #1 Spot — #QuickNews

January 5th, 2019 by  


In 2018, 24,024 fully electric vehicles were sold in the Netherlands, three times as many as in 2017, according to figures from industry associations RAI and BOVAG and data specialist RDC. Of all new cars registered in 2018, 5.4% of them were electric vehicles (excludes plug-in hybrids) — one of the highest market shares worldwide. In December, 30.4% of cars sold were fully electric cars.

The best-selling EV in 2018 was the Tesla Model S, followed by Jaguar I-PACE and Nissan LEAF. Here are the top 10:

Model2018 Sales
Tesla Model S5,633
Jaguar I-PACE3,495
Nissan LEAF3,369
Tesla Model X2,966
Volkswagen e-Golf2,242
BMW i31,602
Hyundai Ioniq1,500
Renault Zoe1,017
Opel Ampera-e860
Hyundai Kona EV551

There are now some 49,000 EVs in the Netherlands. BOVAG and RAI expect sales of some 28,000 in 2019, thanks to the arrival of the Tesla Model 3 and greater choice in the middle-priced segment (sales price between €30,000 and €40,000).

The higher-priced segment is expected to grow less fast, since tax advantages for new EVs are now capped at €50,000 starting on January 1, 2019. Businesses pay less tax on EVs than on other cars in the Netherlands. In December 2018, sales of high-priced cars accelerated because of the change in tax rules.

In 2021, the government is expected to launch a new national support scheme which will apply to all buyers of EVs. Households may delay the purchase of an EV until that time. 
 





 

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About the Author

Energy journalist, analyst and moderator since the turn of the century. Former editor-in-chief of Energy Post and European Energy Review, former reporter at the Dutch Financieele Dagblad (major financial newspaper). I look for the big picture and cover the entire energy sector in all its breadth and depth. Independent, but not ideological (when it comes to energy).



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