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Why Aspark’s Electric Hypercar Owl Means More Serious Business For Gas Exotics

Most of us won’t be able to afford a Tesla Roadster 2.0 at $200,000 and can only dream about doing 0 to 60 mph in under 2 seconds. Nor will we get a chance to own an Aspark Owl EV. And just what exactly is an Aspark Owl EV?

Do we need another electric hypercar? We love that question and still say yes, yes, and yes.

Aspark Owl EV

Why Another Electric Hypercar Means Good News For Everyone

Let’s get that one out of the way. Most of us won’t be able to afford a Tesla Roadster 2.0 at $200,000 and can only dream about doing 0 to 60 mph in under 2 seconds. Nor will we get a chance to own an Aspark Owl EV. And just what exactly is an Aspark Owl EV?

The Aspark Owl EV is the latest in the continual and brutal onslaught on the performance world’s internal combustion engine (ICE) vestige.

Aspark Owl EV

Trickling down, one drop at a time … is a thing that actually happens in the car world.

Before we had seatbelts in every car as we do today, they were only in certain cars. The same thing happens when new technology of various stripes is introduced. It is first found only in the premium segment, expensive and rare. It finally trickles down to everyone … eventually. You can see that with the traction control systems introduced on higher-end cars in the ’80s. They are now commonly found almost everywhere. A/C? Same thing. Power windows. Ditto. The list runs long and electric vehicles (EV) are delivering the same potential.

What once made us dream — wild, futuristic cars — could be tomorrow’s car collector items. Soon, a new generation will drool over whatever new Rimac Concept_X is out while collectors will try to get their hands on the few Concept_One ever made. And what about the others — or as the Italian collector car clubs call them, the etceterinis. That is, anything outside the big obvious halo cars? We’re talking about cars like the Aspark Owl and its impressive electric performance, sorely reminding us the ICE age has come and gone already.

How The Aspark Owl Works

Aspark Owl EV

Love or hate the 0 to 60s and Nurburgring quotes, that’s what the public has come to expect from top cars. The Aspark Owl delivers a lot on that last point, with a record to boot — hitting 0–60 mph in just 1.921 seconds. That puts this very-high-performance EV inline with all other supercars out there, but only using electricity (no stinky gas).

The platform sports an electric motor at each axle. The total output is 430 HP, with 563 pound-feet of torque delivered through all four wheels. Wait a second, $4.4 million for 430 HP? OK, that’s crazy, but when we take the Owl’s weight into consideration, things change a bit. That 430 HP is pushing 1,874 pounds, which means a lot of get up and go. In order to deliver as much energy as possible on the street, Aspark intelligently opted for a combination of batteries and supercapacitors. The total range is 93 miles, which may not sound like a lot but will be enough to thoroughly annoy any and all exotic car owners around your area.Aspark Owl EV

There is a seat for every posterior out there. It is still true today as it was decades ago. The $4.4 million is also related to the fact that Aspark will only produce 50 models of the Owl — far fewer than we can expect from Tesla Roadster 2.0.

And how does the Aspark Owl feel? Perhaps the video below can give you a slight impression.

Making Sense Of Electric Hypercars

Aspark Owl EV

There will always be those who drool over numbers and specs, even though the cars themselves can’t be afforded. There will always those who don’t care about that kind of performance anyway, and will never find out what an Aspark Owl is. But there is no better way to raise awareness around the competitive potential of an electric motor coupled to batteries.

Jalopnik found that Aspark Owl is actually a consulting company, much in the vein of Raesr and XING. It is interested in showcasing its technology and expertise to land more consulting gigs. Consider the Owl an elaborate advertising campaign. Anyway, the more electric hypercars come out showing their ICE counterparts are extremely antiquated, the better it is for everyone in the end.

Aspark Owl EV

 

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Written By

Nicolas was born and raised around classic cars of the 1920s, but it wasn't until he drove an AC Propulsion eBox and a Tesla Roadster that the light went on. Ever since he has produced green mobility content on various CleanTech outlets since 2007 and found his home on CleanTechnica. He grew up in an international environment and his communication passion led to cover electric vehicles, autonomous vehicles, renewable energy, test drives, podcasts, shoot pictures, and film for various international outlets in print and online. Nicolas offers an in-depth look at the e-mobility world through interviews and the many contacts he has forged in those industries. His favorite taglines are: "There are more solutions than obstacles." and "Yesterday's Future Now"

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