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Students studying Bachelor and Master programs at the University of Bristol's Department of Computer Science will team up in one of Lloyd's Register's latest wind energy initiatives intent on developing and improving wind speed analysis so as to better monitor and predict wind trends. 

Clean Power

Lloyd’s Register & University Of Bristol Team Up To Improve Wind Speed Analysis

Students studying Bachelor and Master programs at the University of Bristol’s Department of Computer Science will team up in one of Lloyd’s Register’s latest wind energy initiatives intent on developing and improving wind speed analysis so as to better monitor and predict wind trends. 

Students studying Bachelor and Master programs at the University of Bristol’s Department of Computer Science will team up in one of Lloyd’s Register’s latest wind energy initiatives intent on developing and improving wind speed analysis so as to better monitor and predict wind trends.

Announced earlier this month by Lloyd’s Register, the partnership will serve to develop and improve wind speed analysis and data for trend comparisons using Lloyd’s Register’s “windiness dashboard” — a product which can be used by investors, developers, owners, and operators of current wind farms to assess and predict energy production, through all stages of development.

Being able to accurately predict and monitor wind speed trends is a vital tool not only for operators of wind farms — who are looking to provide accurate data that describes what their particular farm will provide — but also for developers who are looking for the right location to build their project. The new initiative between the University of Bristol and Lloyd’s Register provides the wind industry with a new way to investigate wind speed and wind farm production trends, and to determine the efficiency and energy production from a wind farm.

“Wind speed variability remains one of the most pressing issues for developers and operators of wind farms,” explained David Pullinger, Technical Lead of Energy Resource Services at Lloyd’s Register. “Wind is inherently variable and this has a significant impact on the financial returns of projects. By providing access to the accurate, clear and concise information the industry demands this project will increase understanding of the risks involved, resulting in better decision making. This initiative with the University of Bristol sets out to investigate, test and deliver a unique platform to industry.”

“We want to inspire the next generation of engineers and scientists, and this partnership with the University of Bristol is one example of how we are inspiring students in to the world of work, sharing what we do to enhance the global drive for cleaner and more sustainable energy production,” Pullinger added.

The project between the two organizations has already begun and will run through April, after which Lloyd’s Register and the University of Bristol will publish their findings in May.

“Our solutions approach to improving predictability and reliability ensures that a wide range of future wind farms offshore and onshore stand to benefit from the data we can share through the ‘windiness dashboard’. We look forward to working with our partner the University of Bristol and its students on this exciting project.”

 
 
 
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