Clean Power

Published on October 11th, 2017 | by Giles Parkinson

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Windlab Lands PPA For Wind, Solar, & Storage Project

October 11th, 2017 by  

Originally published on RenewEconomy

The newly listed Australian renewable energy developer Windlab has secured a landmark power purchase agreement (PPA) for what will be the country’s first grid-connected large-scale hybrid project combining wind, solar and battery storage.

Windlab announced this week that it has secured a 10-year agreement with the Queensland government-owned CS Energy, which will buy both the renewable energy and some of the large-scale generation certificates (LGCs) produced from phase 1 of the Kennedy Energy Park.

The first phase of Kennedy is for a 60.5 MW hybrid renewable energy project comprises 43.5 MW of wind capacity, 15 MW of solar PV capacity and a 2 MW Lithium ion battery storage installation near Hughenden.

Figure 2: The almost “baseload” impact of wind & pv at Kennedy stage 1. Source: Company

Kennedy is a 50/50 joint venture with Eurus Energy Holdings of Japan, and Windlab hopes to develop it into a massive 1200MW wind and solar project (plus storage) over time, providing the equivalent of “baseload” power in the north of the state. CS Energy has first option over the output of that expanded plant.

Windlab recently completed a capital raising and stock market listing to help it fund the first stage of the Kennedy project, and other projects in its pipeline.

“Finalising an off-take arrangement for the project is an important milestone in securing financing and advancing the project to financial close and construction,” executive chairman Roger Price said in a statement.





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About the Author

is the founding editor of RenewEconomy.com.au, an Australian-based website that provides news and analysis on cleantech, carbon, and climate issues. Giles is based in Sydney and is watching the (slow, but quickening) transformation of Australia's energy grid with great interest.



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