Way Cool Tesla Model 3 Touchscreen Simulator, Production Pep Talk

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This article about the Tesla Model 3 was first published on Gas2

The one feature that dominates the interior of the Tesla Model 3 is its unique, horizontal touchscreen. All the car’s controls — from heating and ventilation, to regen braking and steering settings — is controlled from that one screen. There is no separate instrument cluster. The driver’s speed, route, energy usage, musical selections, and Autopilot settings are all displayed on that one screen.

Way Cool Model 3 Touchscreen Simulator

Obviously, it is going to take people a while to adapt to the new ultra-modern, highly simplified interior design. Customers may have to wait a year or more for their car to be built, but thanks to Andrew Goodlad, whose Twitter handle is @Ichorus, they can hone their Model 3 driving skills on an online simulator that is the closest thing yet to a real Model 3 touchscreen.

Goodlad used Invision to create his simulator. The source of his inspiration came solely from various videos of the Model 3 interior he was able to find online. He says his simulator is a great opportunity to “play around” with the touchscreen owners will find when their own Model 3 finally lands in their driveway.

https://twitter.com/Ichorus/status/892715854860832768

Say Hello To Production Hell

Also appearing online this week is a YouTube video of a Tesla executive giving the workers who will assemble the Model 3 a pep talk just hours before the official launch party that took place at the Fremont factory.

The official is believed to be Peter Hochholdinger, the long-time Audi production supervisor Tesla hired away to manage its Model 3 production line. Hochholdinger has said previously that what Tesla is doing on its assembly line is at least 7 years ahead of anything Audi has ever done at its manufacturing plants.

Musk has said his company will now be going through “production hell” as it learns how to ramp up the assembly line for the Model 3 to 5,000 cars or more a week by the end of this year. “There’s a lot of work in front of us, who’s scared about that?” Hochholdinger asks the employees in a video posted online by Like Tesla. When no one raises a hand, he says “Good! Thank you!”

Later, he tells the workers, “We’re going to change the world, and the beginning is today.” If any of you get your Model 3 sooner than expected, it will be because of the efforts of Peter Hochholdinger and the workers at the Fremont factory. And when it does arrive, you will already be an expert at using its touchscreen after putting a few hundred hours on Andrew Goodlad’s simulator.

Source: Teslarati


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Steve Hanley

Steve writes about the interface between technology and sustainability from his home in Florida or anywhere else The Force may lead him. He is proud to be "woke" and doesn't really give a damn why the glass broke. He believes passionately in what Socrates said 3000 years ago: "The secret to change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old but on building the new."

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