Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
GE Renewable Energy has partnered with ENGIE in Australia to develop the 119 MW Willogoleche Wind Farm in South Australia, which is expected to be completed by the middle of 2018 and to generate enough electricity for 80,000 homes. 

Clean Power

GE & ENGIE Partner On 119 Megawatt South Australian Wind Farm

GE Renewable Energy has partnered with ENGIE in Australia to develop the 119 MW Willogoleche Wind Farm in South Australia, which is expected to be completed by the middle of 2018 and to generate enough electricity for 80,000 homes. 

GE Renewable Energy has partnered with ENGIE in Australia to develop the 119 MW Willogoleche Wind Farm in South Australia, which is expected to be completed by the middle of 2018 and to generate enough electricity for 80,000 homes.

French multinational electric utility company ENGIE announced earlier this month that it had begun pre-construction work on its 119 MW (megawatt) Willogoleche Wind Farm, set to be constructed in South Australia, 160 kilometers north of the state’s capital, Adelaide. The wind farm, once completed in mid-2018, will generate enough electricity to power the equivalent of 80,000 homes.

On Friday, ENGIE in Australia announced that it had begun pre-construction work on the $250 (AUD) project, which will be made up of 32 wind turbines to be provided by GE Renewable Energy. GE, which announced its involvement on Saturday, will provide 24 3.8 MW wind turbines and 8 3.4 MW wind turbines.

“We are excited to be working with ENGIE on this project, and to continue our commitment to serving the energy needs of South Australia,” said Geoff Culbert, President & CEO, GE Australia, New Zealand & Papua New Guinea.

“We have seen tremendous momentum in the Australian wind industry this year. This will be our fourth wind farm to begin construction in 2017, with more than 300 GE turbines either operating or under construction across the country, capable of powering the equivalent of more than 500,000 Australian homes with renewable energy.

“It is encouraging to see more projects like this reach financial close, and we look forward to continuing to bring the best renewables technology to Australia.”

South Australia remains one of the world’s leading renewable energy states, with a significant portion of its electricity being generated by wind energy. In fact, earlier this year the State’s target of sourcing 50% of its electricity from renewable energy was achieved well ahead of schedule. While renewable energy is a hot issue in Australia, given the current state of entrenched coal-backed politicians, states like South Australia are well on their way to driving the country’s renewable energy industry forward, despite the Federal Government’s lackluster performance.

 
 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Advertisement
 
Written By

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, and I believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.

Comments

You May Also Like

Cars

Interview responses in article form presented to David Waterworth by Emma Hunt.

Cars

By David Waterworth, from material supplied by Murray Keys Gympie is a tidy town 2 hours north of Brisbane. It is situated in the...

Clean Transport

Based on an interview with Paul Kahlert, General Manager of All Purpose Transport

Clean Power

The new Australian government has committed to renewable energy and storage as it pivots away from the policies of Scott Morrison.

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.