Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
The German auto industry association VDA is working, through a plan to reduce the pollution of older diesel cars in use in Germany, against the possible implementation of outright diesel vehicle bans in some cities.

Policy & Politics

German Auto Association VDA Working Against Diesel Vehicle Ban Plans, Unsurprisingly

The German auto industry association VDA is working, through a plan to reduce the pollution of older diesel cars in use in Germany, against the possible implementation of outright diesel vehicle bans in some cities.

The German auto industry association VDA is working, through a plan to reduce the pollution of older diesel cars in use in Germany, against the possible implementation of outright diesel vehicle bans in some cities.

The much discussed plans to possibly selectively ban diesel vehicles in some German cities, whether generally or just during times of high air pollution, are (unsurprisingly) not getting support from the country’s major auto manufacturers.

This is probably mostly due to the effect that the discussion of possible bans is having on diesel vehicles sales figures in Germany. Again, who’s surprised?

The head of VDA, Matthias Wissmann, commented on these goals at a recent news conference in Germany: “I believe that when there is a clear political signal and willingness to act by manufacturers, I believe we can avoid bans.”

Reuters provides more: “The German government last week announced plans to work with automakers and regional governments to find ways to reduce emissions, culminating in a meeting on Aug. 2.

“Wissmann said he expected an agreement would be reached by then on who would cover the costs for updating software of around 3 million older diesel cars to cut their emissions.”

It’ll be interesting to see what the effects of the meeting on August 2nd will be, as regards possible outright bans of diesel vehicles in some German cities. It would probably be a mistake to assume that diesel vehicle bans in Germany are a sure thing at this point, considering how much clout the auto manufacturers in Germany currently wield.

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 

Don't want to miss a cleantech story? Sign up for daily news updates from CleanTechnica on email. Or follow us on Google News!
 

Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.
Advertisement
 
Written By

James Ayre's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy.

Comments

You May Also Like

Clean Transport

One of the tough things about designing any kind of machine is that the real world can be a little more punishing than the...

Cars

A company that is answering the call for EVs in various segments people have been crying for and doing it in a big way...

Cars

It seems the German automotive market has bottomed out, having grown 3% in August, while plugins are also recovering. Sales of full electric vehicles...

Clean Power

Anytime anyone uses the term 'energy independence', correct them to 'strategic energy interdependence'.

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.