Cars

Published on January 30th, 2017 | by James Ayre

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2 Hawaii Utility Companies Now Offering $10,000 Rebates On 2017 Nissan LEAF

January 30th, 2017 by  

Rebates of up to $10,000 are now being offered in Hawaii on the 2017 Nissan Leaf by two utility companies there — the Kaua’i Island Utility Cooperative and the Hawaiian Electric Company.

The two utility companies are clearly looking to spur higher rates of electric vehicle (EV) adoption with the rebates, and thus to increase the number of people relying on the utilities for “fueling/recharging” of their vehicles. After all, the utilities don’t get a cut of gasoline/petrol sales, do they? So why not push for the widespread adoption of EVs?

It’s notable also that gasoline/petrol costs are pretty high in Hawaii, as they are on most remote islands.

The new 2017 Nissan Leaf rebates will be available through March, reportedly.

Green Car Reports provides more: “They are a small initial step toward a recently-announced goal of entirely carbon-free transportation, with all ground vehicles running on renewable energy by 2045. Hawaii already has a goal for utilities to generate 100% of electricity from renewable sources by that year, according to CBS News, and is now considering how to extend that provision to transportation.”

As it stands, there are only around 5,000 plug-in electric vehicles in Hawaii (amongst a total fleet of around 1 million vehicles), so if the state is to transition to 100% EVs, there’s still quite a lot of work to be done. The new rebates seem decent enough to help spur on such adoption. Hopefully the local government will start pushing for aggressive actions to support EV adoption there sometime soon as well.





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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



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