Clean Power

Published on June 18th, 2016 | by Smiti

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India Plans Addition Of 40 GW Of Solar Parks

June 18th, 2016 by  



Originally published on Planetsave.

The Indian government has increased its target to set up ultra mega solar projects in an attempt to meet the monumental target of 100 GW of operational solar capacity by March 2022.

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy is reportedly planning to implement a second phase of the solar parks program. At present, the Ministry has approved solar parks in 21 states with a cumulative capacity of 19,900 MW. Phase II of the program will add another 20 GW of capacity.

India plans to have 100 GW of operational solar capacity by March 2022. This includes 20 GW from solar parks and 40 GW from rooftop solar power projects. However, the market response to rooftop solar has been rather weak compared to the solar park program.

Industry watchers have expressed doubts about the huge rooftop solar target. This, perhaps, could be a reason for increasing the capacity addition target under the solar park program.

Auctions for solar parks have already started in India, and have also seen huge competition among project developers. This competition has yielded the lowest price ever in India’s solar power market.

NTPC Limited has been chosen to set up a number of solar power parks. The company has a pipeline of 3.5 GW of solar capacity. It will set up UMPPs in Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Odisha, and Madhya Pradesh. Other government-owned companies are also expected to be tasked with setting up similar projects in other states.

Reprinted with permission.





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About the Author

works as a senior solar engineer at a reputed engineering and management consultancy. She has conducted due diligence of several solar PV projects in India and Southeast Asia. She has keen interest in renewable energy, green buildings, environmental sustainability, and biofuels. She currently resides in New Delhi, India.



  • Freddy D

    Deploying rooftop solar at massive scale has been challenging in the US, Europe, and the rest of Asia because the industry simply has failed to reduce balance of system costs to compete with utility scale solar. The projects seem to be too small and intricate. Rooftop is well worth pursuing, at some level, though because it utilizes land more efficiently and if these BOS costs can be reduced it would be great. Government has a huge role in 1) streamlining permitting process nationwide and 2) buidling codes that require roofs to be solar-ready, rather than full of obstacles.

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