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Gamesa Offers “Pioneering” 2 MW Offgrid Solution

Spanish wind energy giant Gamesa has launched a “pioneering” offgrid solution to supply power to remote areas without grid access.

Announced this week, Gamesa will now offer an offgrid power system which combines solar, wind, diesel, and batteries, with an installed capacity of over 2 MW, which will provide reliable electricity to remote areas without reliable or any grid access — generating electricity enough for the needs of 400 families.

At a ceremony to inaugurate the unveiling of the company’s offgrid prototype, Ignacio Martín, Chairman of Gamesa, explained that “development of this system represents another milestone in Gamesa’s quest to resolve energy needs in a sustainable manner.” Martin continued:

“At present, more than 1.2 billion people lack access to electricity. Rural areas of India, South-east Asia, Africa, islands such as Haiti, Indonesia and the Philippines, and other remote corners of the plant, such as jungles and deserts, stand to benefit from these offgrid solutions which can generate cheaper and cleaner power.”

Gamesa claims that its prototype is the first to market which bundles solar, wind, diesel, and battery together, and to have a combined capacity of over 2 MW that can be tailored to specific project requirements. The company’s goal is for the two renewable energy options, combined with battery storage, to minimize the need for diesel — though it remains as a backup. Specifically, Gamesa’s prototype combines a G52-850 kW wind turbine with 816 photovoltaic modules (245 kWp) and three 222-kW diesel generators (666 kW), with plans to add a battery capable of storing 500 kWh by the summer.

“Gamesa’s entry into the offgrid sector represents a fresh technological challenge and a new niche opportunity: development of this class of technology is expected to reach 1,200 MW in the coming years,” said David Mesonero, Gamesa’s Director of Business Development. “The advantage of our system is based on its flexibility: it can be tailored for customer needs by increasing, reducing or eliminating capacity in any of the technologies used.”

 
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