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Published on September 26th, 2015 | by Zachary Shahan

14

EPA Ratings Published For Tesla Model X

September 26th, 2015 by  


Originally published on EV Obsession.

The long-awaited Tesla Model X is almost here, and we’ve got another sign that it’s ready to roll. Aside from getting its HOV-lane sticker and EV rebate eligibility from California, the X is also now listed on the US EPA’s website, which shows its official “fuel economy,” range, passenger and cargo space, and other specs. There are just two versions of the Model X listed so far, the P90D X and the 90D X. It’s not clear yet if Tesla will offer Model X SUVs with smaller (or larger) battery packs, but it’s presumed the company will — perhaps just after production ramps up a bit.

I took some screenshots comparing the Tesla Model X P90D and Tesla Model X 90D for your viewing pleasure (you’re welcome) and for easier reference here. Check ’em out:

Tesla Model X fuel economy Tesla Model X Specs


 

92 MPGe (37 kWh/100 miles) and 89 MPGe (38 kWh/100 miles) — pretty wicked efficiency for an SUV that seats 7 and is quicker than almost every sports car ever produced, eh? Of course, that was expected, since the X is an electric vehicle, but it’s still very much worth highlighting.

Perhaps of more interest to soon-to-be owners and potential owners is range. As we noted the other day, the rated range of the Model X P90D recently rose to 250 miles (from 240 miles) in the design studio that only Signature X reservation holders invited to configure their cars are able to see. That might have simply changed at the last minute when the EPA rating was finalized. For the Tesla Model X 90D, range is predictably a bit better, sitting at 257 miles. Naturally, the range can vary a great deal based on how you drive the vehicle and external factors such as temperature.

Interestingly, from the “Specs” tab, the EPA says the Model X is not a “gas guzzler.” It also indicates passenger and cargo/luggage volume (separately), electric motor and battery size, and expected charging times. As I explained in my “Electric Car Charging 101” piece, most electric cars have a 6.6 kW onboard charger, and a few have a 3.3 kW onboard charger, while the Model S has a 10 kW onboard charger or, if the buyer pays for the extra option, a 20 kW onboard dual charger. The X seems to have the same. To put that in terms that matter for the average human, here’s the point:

  • a 3.3 kW onboard charger allows an electric car to add ~11 miles of driving range in an hour at 240V;
  • a 6.6 kW onboard charger allows an electric car to add ~22 miles of driving range in an hour at 240V;
  • a 10 kW onboard charger allows an electric car to add ~29 miles of driving range in an hour at 240V;
  • a 20 kW onboard dual charger allows an electric car to add ~58 miles of driving range in an hour at 240V.

Yet another big benefit to Tesla vehicles.

I think that’s all the Tesla Model X news for the time being. We’ll have much more in a few days… if not sooner. If you missed any of these recent pieces, though, check them out now:

Tesla Model X Falcon-Wing Doors Live! (In-Action Video)

How The Model X 2nd-Row Seats Work (Images)

Could The Tesla Model X Get A $25,000 Tax Deduction?

Windshield Of Tesla Model X To Be One Of Its Best Features

Tesla Model X 0-60 Time Beats Every SUV In History

Tesla Model X Design Studio Images & Specs Leaked

Model X Times 4 — Looking Hot (3 Pics, 1 Video)

Double Model X Video

 
 


 


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About the Author

is tryin' to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director, chief editor, and CEO. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada, and Curaçao. Zach has long-term investments in NIO [NIO], Tesla [TSLA], and Xpeng [XPEV]. But he does not offer (explicitly or implicitly) investment advice of any sort.



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