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Published on March 14th, 2015 | by Giles Parkinson

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Rooftop Solar Now Installed On 27% Of Detached Homes In SE Queensland

March 14th, 2015 by  


Originally published on RenewEconomy.

Rooftop solar systems are now installed in 27 per cent of detached homes in south-east Queensland, according to the latest data released by the local network operator, Energex.

The data shows that south-east Queensland now has 281,811 rooftop solar systems, totalling more than 937MW. At the current rate of installation, the 1GW market will be met within four or five months.

However, as the graph below shows, more than one third of the residential rooftop solar installations – or 304MW – receive a reduced tariff – now 6.4c/kWh – for exports, rather than the 44c/kWh.

Most of these are new systems, ordered and installed since the 44c/kWh tariffs was ended. However, another 889 systems fell off the 44c feed in tariff, meaning that the number receiving that tariff has fallen by nearly 14,000, or nearly 7%, in the last 15 months.

The installation rate puts it at a par with South Australia, where rooftop arrays are installed in more than 23 per cent of customers.

In February, 2,164 new solar systems were connected to the network, and another 2,604 applications were received. Energex says this is below the long term average.

Another 889 systems fell off the 44c feed in tariff, meaning that the number receiving that tariff has fallen by nearly 14,000, or nearly 7%, in the last 15 months. The average feed-in tariff paid per day to a customer with Solar PV is $2.08.

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Reprinted with permission. 
 
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About the Author

is the founding editor of RenewEconomy.com.au, an Australian-based website that provides news and analysis on cleantech, carbon, and climate issues. Giles is based in Sydney and is watching the (slow, but quickening) transformation of Australia's energy grid with great interest.



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