Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Clean Power

UK Large-Scale Solar PV Saw 600% Growth In 2013

A new blog post from NPD Solarbuzz’s Vice President, Finlay Colville, sourcing several NPD Solarbuzz analyses, has determined that UK large-scale solar PV installations grew by a whopping 600% during 2013, amounting to a record of 1.45 GW new solar PV capacity added through the 12 month period.

Over 90% of the installations were ground-mounted, helping the UK become one of only six countries that had or approached a GW-level large-scale solar market during 2013.

140114_large_scale_pv_in_2013_by_country

Large-Scale PV in 2013 by Country
Image Credit: NPD Solarbuzz Marketbuzz Report

While the UK only ranked sixth (out of that six), they were one of only four countries to rank in the top 10 for both small- and large-scale solar PV demand.

On top of that, the UK was one of only five countries to rank in both the small- and large-scale solar PV demand top 10’s for 2013, a development that, as Colville notes, “should be welcome news to DECC and UK trade associations in their quest to diversify the UK PV landscape.”

The UK ground-mount pipeline has similarly seen a health 2013, exceeding 5 GW — a figure which includes all projects that have not been completed, as well as projects that have been terminated. As Colville explains, the inclusion of ‘terminated’ projects in the overall rests on the fact that “history informs us from other countries that such sites are often bought by new parties, or resurrected in the future when circumstances/policies/infrastructures change.”

140114_uk_large_scale_ground_mount_solar_pv_pipeline

UK Large-Scale Ground-Mount Solar PV Pipeline, Total approx. 5 GW
Image Credit: NPD Solarbuzz Global Deal Tracker Report

Currently, a host of factors is helping to create an unofficial market cap,” concludes Colville. “Some are global (module supply availability), and some are UK specific (rate of success at the local council level, project developers bandwidth/financial-stability, grid capacity and access, etc.).”

Nevertheless, the PV industry is set to be relatively well shielded from major political disturbances over the next two years, allowing for the possibility that they could break the 2 GW barrier at some point in the near future. For, as Colville notes, “for those living in the UK it is hard to remember the last time the UK’s energy supply and long-term policies approached a position of stability that were completely risk free.”

The full post by Finlay Colville is available to read at NPD Solarbuzz

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
 

Advertisement
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, and I believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.

Comments

You May Also Like

Cars

I’ve noticed that a lot of new electric vehicle models have been marketed for use as emergency services vehicles in the past year. It...

Clean Transport

Originally posted on EVANNEX. By Charles Morris It sounds like the perfect plot for a conspiracy thriller: the giant oil companies are buying up electric vehicle...

Clean Transport

The move aims to drastically increase the rate at which charge points are being built so the UK can hit its 2030 target for...

Cars

The UK  auto market, Europe’s third largest, saw plugin electric vehicle share of 18.3% in August 2021, up 1.9x from 9.76% in August 2020....

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.