Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Clean Power

US Installes 33 MW Of New Solar Power Capacity In April

This article was originally published on Solar Love.

33 MW of new utility-scale solar energy capacity were installed in the United States during the month of April. This total includes 17 MW from the first phase of the Yuma Foothills Solar Power Plant, 5 MW from the Celina Solar project I in Ohio, and 4.2 MW from two projects in California, among others. The US now possesses an impressive 5.14 GW of total solar energy capacity.

Denver solar panels

Denver solar panels via Wikimedia Commons.



The 17 MW of capacity supplied by the aforementioned Foothills Solar Power Plant accounts for more than half of the new solar capacity installed during April. The project is currently being developed by the Arizona Public Services Co. in Yuma, Arizona, and will see its capacity roughly doubled by this time next year, following the construction of the second phase. The second phase will add a further 18 MW of capacity, and is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

5 MW of the new capacity was provided the Celina Solar project I Mercer County, Ohio. The project was developed by SolarVision LLC, and will provide about 8% of the city of Celina’s electricity.

PV Magazine provides further details:

Light Beam Energy Inc. went online with two projects totalling 4.2 MW in Butte County, California. Light Beam’s 1.7 MW Gridley Main One Solar scheme will supply power to the city of Gridley and the 2.5 MW Main Two project will sell energy to San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit.

Warsaw Solar 2 LLC connected the 2 MW Warsaw Solar 2 project in Duplin County, North Carolina, which will sell energy to Progress Energy Carolinas and Hannon Strong Solar LLC added 1.4 MW with its project to power US Army Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas to round off the new build generation schemes totalling 29.6 MW.

The last 3.4 MW was from the expansion of three previously constructed projects.

As of the end of April, 2013, the US has seen the installation of 845 MW of new solar energy capacity, a significant jump over the same period last year — which saw 348 MW installed.

And something to note — while 5.14 GW of total solar energy generating capacity is impressive when taken on its own, it only represents 0.44% of the US’s total energy generation…. A significant increase in the rate of installation will be needed to stem the worst of the effects predicted from future climate change, or even for that matter to keep up with the rest of the world. Germany and China, among other countries, are both transitioning away from fossil fuels relatively quickly — it wouldn’t be intelligent for us to let ourselves fall too far behind.

 

Advertisement
 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

James Ayre's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy.

Comments

You May Also Like

Clean Power

As the latest IPCC report notes, cities will play a critical role in climate action over the next decade, and many challenges and opportunities for...

Clean Power

In our Summer Electricity Outlook, a supplement to our May 2022 Short-Term Energy Outlook, we expect the largest increases in U.S. electric power sector generation this...

Clean Power

Killer combo of offshore wind and green hydrogen indicates that rapid decarbonization is achievable, if policy makers do the right thing.

Clean Power

Green hydrogen is going down in cost, and concentrating solar power could pick up the pace by ditching electrolysis in favor of a thermochemical...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.