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HyperSolar Envisions Solar Powered Hydrogen “Farms”

Hypersolar envisions solar powered hydrogen production systemsLast year the solar company HyperSolar, Inc. filed a patent application for a solar powered system that creates renewable methane gas from water, which it has been testing out at California’s Salton Sea.  Just last week, the company announced that it has completed  a proof-of-concept prototype for a solar-powered hydrogen generator, so this looks like a good time to check in and see what they’re up to.

Everything you need to know about hydrogen

Hydrogen can be produced from plain water through a reaction touched off by electricity. However, it takes a significant amount of energy to split hydrogen atoms from water molecules. If the energy in question is a fossil fuel then hydrogen is a wash in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

An emerging solution is to develop hydrogen production systems that are integrated with solar power, essentially mimicking the natural process of photosynthesis.

One notable example of this approach is MIT researcher Daniel Nocera’s solar powered “artificial leaf,” which is based on a small solar module the size of a playing card.

Plastic bags, solar power and green hydrogen

Hypersolar’s system goes even farther down the size spectrum, using tiny particles consisting of a nanoscale solar device and a protective plastic coating.

The particles float in water, and the coating enables them to function in hostile environments including  sea water, wastewater or stormwater runoff. That gives the system a leg up on conventional hydrogen systems, which require purified water.

The reaction takes place at ambient temperatures, so it can take place in a low-cost glass vessel or even an ordinary plastic bag.

For the proof of concept prototype, Hypersolar used a baggie placed in wastewater from a pulp and paper mill.

A little help from hydrogen friends

Hypersolar recently partnered up with the UC-Santa Barbara College of Engineering to bring the technology closer to commercial development, with a focus on using municipal and industrial wastewater as feedstocks. Potentially, the system could be scaled up to form sprawling hydrogen “farms.”

When they’re ready for another announcement, we’ll be sure to check in again.

Image: Courtesy of Hypersolar.

Follow me on Twitter: @TinaMCasey.

 
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Written By

Tina specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Views expressed are her own. Follow her on Twitter @TinaMCasey and Google+.

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