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Denmark Aims for 50% of Electricity from Wind by 2020

Denmark is taking major steps towards a greener future, passing an agreement that the Danish Minister for Climate, Energy and Building, Martin Lidegaard, says is “the broadest, the greenest, and the most long-term energy agreement that has ever been reached in Denmark.”

The agreement establishes a framework for the policy on climate and energy up to 2020 and outlines a direction for the country up until 2050. It was passed by a broad majority in the Danish Parliament led by the government parties and Denmark’s Liberal Party, the Danish People’s Party, the Danish Red-Green Alliance, and the Conservative Party; in total, 171 seats out of 179 in the parliament.

“This is a historic day for Danish energy policy. In our everyday political work, the parties are different shades of red and blue. However, today – together — we have laid down the foundation for a green future,” says Martin Lidegaard.

Middelgrunden windmills outside Copenhagen

The initiatives are as follows;

  • CO2 emissions in 2020 will be reduced by 34% of what they were in 1990.
  • Energy consumption will decrease by more than 12% in 2020 compared to 2006.
  • A total of more than 35% of Danish energy will stem from renewable energy sources.
  • 50% of the country’s electricity consumption will be stem from wind power.
  • The agreement will ensure a stable framework for the business community as a whole, and the energy sector in particular.

“Large changes will be made over the next decade,” says Lidegaard. “However, with this agreement the parties have started a transition that will strengthen the competitiveness of Danish businesses and ensure that citizens will not be subjected to exorbitant price increases on fossil fuels.”

As already reported on CleanTechnica, Denmark recently approved the construction of two large wind farms at Kriegers Flak and Horns Rev.

“Denmark will once again be the global leader in the transition to green energy. This will prepare us for a future with increasing prices for oil and coal. More-over, it will create some of the jobs that we need so desperately, now and in the coming years,” says Lidegaard.

“Investments are necessary if we are to switch society towards green energy. But the bill will be much bigger if we do not act in time. At the same time, the transition will benefit climate mitigation and the environment, and it will ensure the future competitiveness of Danish industry. With this agreement, the parties are sending a clear message that we all assume responsibility and are taking the challenges of the future seriously. It is truly a great day for energy policy in Denmark.”

Source: Danish Ministry of Climate, Energy and Building
Image Source: Andreas Johannsen

 
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Written By

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, and I believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.

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