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Clean Power

Published on June 28th, 2011 | by Zachary Shahan

15

Hybrid Wind/Solar Power Generators for Homes & Businesses

June 28th, 2011 by  


Solair combined micro wind turbines solar panels

SolAir micro wind turbines with solar panels. (click to enlarge)

These look pretty cool. And apparently they are getting quite popular in San Diego. They are small wind turbines combined with solar panels from DyoCore. The name of the product is SolAir.

Each SolAir device has three rotating blades, a 64” radius, and weighs approximately 60 lbs. A solar panel 40 square inches in size is integrated into the micro wind turbines. A SolAir can generate power in winds anywhere from 6 mph to 60 mph. As you can see in the photos above and below, SolAirs are often installed along the roof line of residential or commercial buildings, but they can be used in a variety of locations.

“The unique and proprietary design, including the small footprint, of the DyoCore SolAir products allows our distributors to design and install the system quickly for homeowners and businesses,” David Raines, CEO and founder of DyoCore, says.

The small wind feature combined with solar panels allows for electricity generation on sunny days with little wind or windy days with/without sun, making the SolAir product ideal for many parts of the country during almost any conditions.”

“SolAir’s small wind design was a key factors in the unanimous San Diego County Board of Supervisors fall 2010 approval to increase installation of small wind alternative energy products from two units to five units for residences, thus enhancing alternative energy options for San Diego residents,” a SolAir press release from early June states.

State incentives and federal income tax credits can reportedly cover up to 50-70% of the total cost of the micro clean energy system. Plus, once installed (a quick process), you start saving money on your electric bill.

The company provides a handy “easy math” SolAir Equipment/Job Cost WorkSheet on its website so you can calculate the cost and savings for your own location.

Some basic SolAir details:

  • Weight 60lbs. fully assembled.
  • Can be setup and installed within minutes out of box
  • Height of SolAir from it’s mount bracket surface to the blade at it’s highest point is only 67″.
  • Blade diameter is 60″.
  • Number of Blades – 3 (Aluminum)
  • CEC Listed: 1.6kW at 18mph
  • Maximum output is approximately 2.2kW (26 to 30mph winds)
  • Average power is approximately 400watts (12 to 14mph winds)
  • Quieter than a whisper with no vibration
  • Optimal install height is along the roof line or approximately 20′.
  • SolAir units can be stacked when more energy generation/storage power is needed.
  • Federal 30% tax credit
  • CA CEC – up to 100% direct rebate!
  • 10 year limited warranty
  • On-grid or Off-Grid – combined DC solar/wind output for simple plug and play.

If you prefer your information in video form, here’s an in-depth video for you:

DyoCore also has a blog with numerous articles that go into more detail on the product if you are really interested in this hybrid micro wind and solar power device.

All images via DyoCore


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About the Author

Zach is tryin' to help society help itself (and other species). He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director and chief editor. He's also the president of Important Media and the director/founder of EV Obsession and Solar Love. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, and Canada. Zach has long-term investments in TSLA, FSLR, SPWR, SEDG, & ABB — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in these particular companies and feels like they are good cleantech companies to invest in. But he offers no professional investment advice and would rather not be responsible for you losing money, so don't jump to conclusions.



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