Israel's Ben Gurion Airport Plans 50-Kilowatt Solar Project

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Flying into Israel’s soon-to-be solar powered Ben Gurion Airport may feel like arriving in the “promised land” for more than just those with vested religious interests. Located just outside Tel Aviv, not Jerusalem, the airport has made plans to install 50 kilowatts of solar energy in order to cleanly power the country’s largest international portal. Chip in a few dollars a month to help support independent cleantech coverage that helps to accelerate the cleantech revolution!

As the first Middle Eastern country to arrange to power its airport via the sun, not to mention one of the first in the world, Israel’s forward-thinking commitment to clean energy technology will reap financial rewards. According to an article on Israel21c.org, airport executives predict a $100,000 return on this investment when the excess of clean, solar energy is sold back to the national grid via Israel’s Electric Company. Additionally, this project will further Israel’s national goal to derive 20% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020.

Israel, who has long demonstrated a commitment to clean energy technology in general, is ideally situated to take advantage of solar power and is anxious to get this particular project underway. Slated to begin construction on 2010, the project will require 5,382 square feet, largely source from atop the airport’s long-term parking lots, in order to erect the solar display.

If the solar initiative is a success at Ben Gurion, it is possible that Israel will support additional solar projects in Israel’s other, smaller airports. Eilat, a popular tourist destination that experiences sweltering heat almost every day of the year, is home to the next logical solar-powered airport site, if all goes well in Tel Aviv.

Between the sun-powered venue, the recent renovations and the free wireless internet, not to mention its other eco-friendly amenities, Ben Gurion airport is shaping up to be a miniature “holy land” for clean energy advocates and everyday travelers, regardless of religion.

Source: Israel21c.org, SolarFeeds

Image Credit: MaxVT via Creative Commons


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