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Climate Change

Published on October 7th, 2009 | by Zachary Shahan

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Google Earth Climate & Rainforest Tours

October 7th, 2009 by  


You can now explore the Amazon, Madagascar, and Sebangau National Forest in Borneo through Google Earth.

On September 25, I wrote about a Google Earth tour (narrated by AL Gore) and new Google Earth tools and layers which help people to look at the possible effects of climate change under three different scenarios. Now, three new tours have been launched that allow the exploration of critical rainforests and real-life success stories.

The tours (embedded below) have a great wealth of information and inspirational stories bound into succinct Google Earth or YouTube videos.

Take a look at and enjoy these protection efforts for three critical rainforests around the world.

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Greenpeace and the Amazon

One tour by Greenpeace tells the story of the soya moratorium in the Amazon rainforest in Brazil. This is one important step in the huge effort to stop climate change. As Greenpeace says: “Tropical deforestation accounts for up to a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions, more than all the world’s airplanes, trains and cars. It has led Brazil to become the world’s fourth worst climate polluter and means that runaway climate change cannot be averted unless deforestation is stopped.

For a succint but informative tour of this Amazon success story, visit Google Earth’s “Climate change in Google Earth” page or just watch it here via YouTube.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/v/Fo4WXly4QYk&hl=pl&fs=1&]

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Madagascar

In a tour of six sites around Madagascar, Conservation International examines economic-ecological combinations that can help to save and restore rainforests while providing economic growth as well. The efforts here are a critical step in addressing and slowing climate change. There are many other benefits as well. This video shows how carbon market initiatives can help the environment, the economy, and everyone!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/v/w2L4L6gobLk&hl=pl&fs=1&]

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Sebangau National Park

Sebangau National Park, in Borneo (Indonesia), is ±568.700 hectares and is the habitat of the orangutan and many other endangered species such as the Malayan sun bear, gibbons, horn bills, the clouded leopard, proboscis monkeys, and so on. It is a true biodiversity hotspot and also an extremely important carbon reservoir. In the following Google tour, by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), you can learn much more about this area, problems and conservation efforts here.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/v/ir3Q70UXb_Q&rel=0&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&feature=player_embedded&fs=1]

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These are three great success stories for rainforests around the world and for stopping climate change. Hope you enjoyed them.

Keep in touch with Google’s efforts to address climate change through it’s YouTube channel COP15.

Related Articles:

1) Google Earth Shows Climate Change Effects

2) Amazon Says Goodbye to World’s Largest Meat Exporter

3) What is a Global Citizen? Are You One?

Image Credit 1: H A M Đ i L A H via flickr under a Creative Commons license

Image Credit 2: REMY SAGLIER – DOUBLERAY via flickr under a Creative Commons license

Image Credit 3: Eric in SF via flickr under a Creative Commons license 
 





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About the Author

Zach is tryin' to help society help itself (and other species). He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director and chief editor. He's also the president of Important Media and the director/founder of EV Obsession and Solar Love. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, and Canada. Zach has long-term investments in TSLA, FSLR, SPWR, SEDG, & ABB — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in these particular companies and feels like they are good cleantech companies to invest in. But he offers no professional investment advice and would rather not be responsible for you losing money, so don't jump to conclusions.



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