Solar Energy

Published on October 1st, 2008 | by Ariel Schwartz

105

Scientists Create Energy-Producing Solar Paint

October 1st, 2008 by  

solar paint

A recent partnership between the steel industry and UK university researchers has led to the development of a unique photovoltaic paint that can be applied to steel.

The paint is made up of dye and electrolytes that can be applied as a paste to steel sheets. Four layers of paint are applied to each sheet. When light hits the solar cells, excited molecules release an electron into an electron collector and circuit (nanocrystalline titanium dioxide). Finally, the electrons move back into the dye.

Photovoltaic paint has a number of advantages over traditional solar cells. It doesn’t have the material limitations of silicon solar cells, so it theoretically provides many terawatts of electricity at a low cost. Additionally, the paint can absorb light across the visible spectrum— so even cloudy days will reap lots of energy.

According to steel company Corus Colours, the solar cells can achieve a power conversion efficiency of 11 percent.

Production of solar paint will begin soon— a lab built to develop the new technology is starting work on October 30 in North Wales. Ultimately, researchers at the PV Accelerator Laboratory in North Wales hope to develop a way to apply solar paint to steel at 30 to 40 square meters per second.

I only wonder if solar paint will be available for purchase to consumers in the future— if so, it could easily lead to a do-it-yourself solar revolution.

Photo credit: Corus Colours


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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • Dglinman401

    Our solar liquid power development certainly matured over the years. Mostly the advancements were in process refinements because of the growth in microscopy to support greater nano levels. The skepticism in nano science is greatly reducing as the realization of its contribution to humanity and its healing and solution sciences never before conceived is truly and positively felt. It will become the predominant science for these next 100 years.

  • doug

    In 2008, SUNTCO had just started to announce its breakthroughs with some media blog challenges relating to the feasibility of nanoscience and electrochemistry as even possible in the development of a nano science based solar liquid power (SLP) application that would rival any microelectronics based solar panel system in both cost and efficiency. Today 2012-2013, years later from those discussions, much more information from independent sources, the science community and industry regulators have further validated the feasibility and now existence of solar liquid power in various forms. We are certainly moving forward with our SLP as first presented in the world in 2008 and look forward to its first production by 2014 going into 2015 as planned. It is a highly specialized technology coating to be embedded into OEM materials (not for retail sales), so we are in active discussion with the leading coating manufacturers around the world for its production and distribution.

  • wherecanweseeitinaction

    so exactly where is the proof that this works? where is it being trialed and where can we see the results so far?

    • Ben

      Our solar liquid power (SLP) will be in beta trials in the US, South Africa, Zurich and the UK as already planned and stated. So the positive results achieved here, under various environmental conditions, will conclude production readiness and the required regulatory tests. All normal planning to assure a solid launch where Internet speed is not a factor.

      • Sciencenut04

        Where are these Beta Trials in the US. Is this something that can be observed by consumers? Who will be performing the regulatory tests and who will be monitoring for the success or failure of such? What does the ‘launch’ have to do with internet speed?  

  • Sciencenut04

    Is this something that would be readily available to a consumer at an affordable cost?

    • Supposed to be eventually. We’ll see. It has a long way to go.

      • Sciencenut04

        Suntco is the manufacturer? In the post 1 month ago there is indication that there has been a ‘breakthrough’ which leads people to believe this is a product that is right around the corner. Is this product currently being used in a non-consumer way?

        • breakthroughs can occur all along the research & development path. there’s no solar paint coming to market anytime soon from what i’ve read (and i would bet money on it :D).

        • Sciencenut

          So SUNTCO is a bust! My research has now been confirmed. So what is Dr. Doug Linman doing at SUNTCO now or with this business?

          • duke

            SUNTCO is not a bust in the least and clearly still moving forward with our solar liquid power (SLP). Investments have been tough in a down market, especially in the Solar market because of all the billion dollar losses, but this too is changing. So hope springs eternal.

    • DrDoug

      SUNTCO remains in stealth mode as stated on the website because we are engaged in due diligence efforts with investors for our final launch funding.

      • Sciencenut04

        In business, stealth mode is a company’s temporary state of secretiveness, usually undertaken in order to avoid alerting competitors…

        Sure has been in ‘stealth mode’ a long time. With all the blogging about it I’m pretty sure the competitors are already on alert.

        • Doug

          Yes we agree with you! 2012 was planned as more visible. 2012 will support the construction of operations and then move forward on our planned first beta projects going into 2013 as expected. We thank everyone for their continued interest and look forward to delivering a new future in solar power.

  • Dlinman

    We have had a new breakthough at SUNTCO.com where essentially our Solar Liquid Power (SLP) coating can now be considered an “expense” like a coating or painting of your home and not a long term Captial costs, thus the ROI is relatively immediate. So this financial treatment can now help us to meet our company goal of making renewable Solar power affordable to the masses. We are already 1/3 the cost of any PV solution, but this further advances our commitment to make this significant technology leap truly affordable.

  • duke

    Thank you for the notes. Yes, Solar Liquid Power (SLP) is different from the Corvus solar cell based paint. SUNTCO’s solar liquid power (SLP) is an advanced electrochemical and nanoscience derived lipidsome coating (spray or OEM embedded) and not an ink nor a dye cell based structure. Our efficiencies exceed 40%, we do cross the full light spectrum of UVA, UVB, UVC, Visible and Infrared, collect and distribute power between 12-14 hours per day as our specification. Corvus, and others like us, have taken the leap necessary to arrive a modernity in renewable energy, using solar. The future in this area is now. http://www.suntco.com

  • Duke

    SUNTCO is seeking its final financial push to certify our Solar Liquid Power (SLP) to obtain our regulatory approvals for warranty and public release of our work. Its been years of patient forward movement to assure our work, once released, is well accepted by the masses for the highest efficiency, longest contiguous power application, and the most affordable cost for all. Very exciting times for advancing a significant leap in Solar renewable energy. More to come…

  • Drdoug

    SUNTCO has been waded through these last two years of economy downturns and investment plans stronger now in resolve because, now vetted by several organizations, it is clear that we hold the “game changing” solution to providing the masses with efficient, affordable and attainable solar power from our Solar Liquid Power (SLP). We have managed to stay grounded and focused since 2005 on our own means, then through our first Proof of Concept investor in 2008 and now we look forward to our final investment completing the contiguous operations and support structure establishment, all required domestic and international certifications to establish public release, and finally first service delivery to an awaiting world. Solar Liquid Power (SLP) will promote how this “game changing” renewable energy source from the Sun will forever positively change how we receive and use solar power.

  • Duke

    SUNTCO is moving forward, after years of advancing fringe electrochemical and nano-sciences, to regulatory  certify our solar liquid power (SLP) work, domestically and internationally, to support warranty and certification labeling for public product release.

  • Thank you for your note. Yes, 2011-2012 will be significant for our work advancing Solar Liquid Power (SLP) and its certifications. SUNTCO along with all our supporters will ready our commercial launch soon of this exciting technology advance in solar renewable energy.

  • Efficiency is a word so battered around that we need to constantly remind ourselves of what this means. To us there exist reflectance efficiency, thermodynamic efficiency, charge carrier separation efficiency and conductive efficiency, which sum up our numbers as a technical efficiency which includes quantum efficiency, VOC ratio, and fill factor. This is what efficiency truly means. The fact is, that solar liquid power, as our product of solar synthesis, is highly efficient within this definition, even at at the lowest applications end 39-42%. We are working hard now to regulatory certify and move the funding along to full scale manufacturing for homes, businesses and other applications. Time is wasting and people needs are waiting.

    • Anonymous

      doug we are in south africa and would love to be part of slp as a solution for the self sustainability of our people in the rural areas . where do we start.

      • Dglinman

        Garnett, I have been in South Africa and already have plans to bring our Solar Liquid Power (SLP) to the country. We are hunting larger $$ to bring this about quicker, now that the solar panel industry is having the issues we predicted they would. We have a liquid coating that can embedded in building materials, fabric, cars, sprayed on various housing materials producing 4.4watt/100cm2 of power, nearly 275% more power with a 40-56% efficiency. Its affordable at 1/3 the cost of any Solar panel, film or ink and is cheaper in labor to install which will support many more jobs in SA, positively supporting the economics there.

  • SUNTCO is pursuing solar synthesis in the delivered form of our solar liquid coating (clear) and solar liquid paint (colors). This technology advance incorporates several sciences to achieve the delivery of highly efficient and reliable electricity initially to commercial buildings and homes, from a voltaic coating. The near future will use this renewable solar technology to enhance and compliment current investments in solar panels or can be used as the complete solution. Minimal efficiency is 42% with an average payback of 6 years or less.

  • I must thank many people by now for all the comments and interests emailed to us relating to our Solar Liquid Power (SLP) development. The excitement for us embraces the development of solar synthesis in the form of a solar liquid that promotes “ad-sorbed” radiant energy then converts this highly efficient coating from DC to usable AC power. Many people, much time and focused dedication within a specialized process has got us past the proof of concept. Our efforts now are to concentrate on the certification(s) needs with a next funding round and the productization of our work for public release.

  • Well it has been nearly a full month of great questions and positive interest in our solar liquid paint and coating work, thank all of you. Our SUNTCO website is http://www.suntco.com so contact us through there and will continue to provide updates right out of our lab on our progress and field testing areas. Very exciting times for us after all these years to finally be able to bring about a sustainable future energy solution. Very best to all.

  • Well it has been nearly a full month of great questions and positive interest in our solar liquid paint and coating work, thank all of you. Our SUNTCO website is http://www.suntco.com so contact us through there and will continue to provide updates right out of our lab on our progress and field testing areas. Very exciting times for us after all these years to finally be able to bring about a sustainable future energy solution. Very best to all.

  • Well it has been nearly a full month of great questions and positive interest in our solar liquid paint and coating work, thank all of you. Our SUNTCO website is http://www.suntco.com so contact us through there and will continue to provide updates right out of our lab on our progress and field testing areas. Very exciting times for us after all these years to finally be able to bring about a sustainable future energy solution. Very best to all.

  • Been reading about the research closely and believe it will be out soon. Just wondering when it will be since the green technology is on the rise. Will be very interested to actively involve on the development of the solar paint market. If we can know, roughly how long will it become a reality on the open market? Thanks

  • Been reading about the research closely and believe it will be out soon. Just wondering when it will be since the green technology is on the rise. Will be very interested to actively involve on the development of the solar paint market. If we can know, roughly how long will it become a reality on the open market? Thanks

  • photovolaic paint is great. is it expensive though?

  • photovolaic paint is great. is it expensive though?

  • photovolaic paint is great. is it expensive though?

    • Doug

      We are a solar liquid power(SLP) coating that can be incorporated into paint and embedded in OEM materials which has taken years to mature and stabilize. We are at 4.3 watts per 100cm sq now tested and 1/3 the cost of any solar panel or CSP system. Actively hunting private investors to assure a mature business launch. Our life’s work will greatly contribute to the paradigm change in how solar power will arrive to the masses.

  • photovoltic paint is a really good idea. Is PV paint expensive though?

  • photovoltic paint is a really good idea. Is PV paint expensive though?

  • photovoltic paint is a really good idea. Is PV paint expensive though?

  • Cindy Griffith

    I may hay a solution to appling solar paint to steal

    please contact me at cgriffith@aol.com

  • Cindy Griffith

    I may hay a solution to appling solar paint to steal

    please contact me at cgriffith@aol.com

  • We have learned so much during our characterization process that we believe now reaching the $1.00/watt industry goal is achievable. At first I was certainly skeptical and possibly overly conservative in our posturing for good reason, but now through the use of some extraordinary equipment at the nano level we have been able to see exactly where we were and have now taken our work. So we are very pleased to report that our solar paint and coatings as a solid entrant into the solar power market to generate electric power to homes and building will occur shortly. Our journey started in 2004 , advanced in 2007, funded in 2009 and now hit our planned mark remains a great adventure. Thank you folks for all the letters.

  • We have learned so much during our characterization process that we believe now reaching the $1.00/watt industry goal is achievable. At first I was certainly skeptical and possibly overly conservative in our posturing for good reason, but now through the use of some extraordinary equipment at the nano level we have been able to see exactly where we were and have now taken our work. So we are very pleased to report that our solar paint and coatings as a solid entrant into the solar power market to generate electric power to homes and building will occur shortly. Our journey started in 2004 , advanced in 2007, funded in 2009 and now hit our planned mark remains a great adventure. Thank you folks for all the letters.

  • Chris Thompson

    The solar paint efficiency of 65-90% claimed by SunTCO is technically infeasible. Rest assure, if there were any credibility to these claims the world would be talking about it. But other than some vague BS posted on the SunTCO site and a few message board posts by Dr. Linman, no evidence that SunTCO has anything going for it at all exists – clearly all the characteristics of a fraudulent organization similar to XEthanol. And that’s of course why you, Rishiddh, will never get a straight answer from Dr. Linman to a straight question. Besides, at $2/W, who needs this? FSLR has already broken the $1/W threshold.

  • Chris Thompson

    The solar paint efficiency of 65-90% claimed by SunTCO is technically infeasible. Rest assure, if there were any credibility to these claims the world would be talking about it. But other than some vague BS posted on the SunTCO site and a few message board posts by Dr. Linman, no evidence that SunTCO has anything going for it at all exists – clearly all the characteristics of a fraudulent organization similar to XEthanol. And that’s of course why you, Rishiddh, will never get a straight answer from Dr. Linman to a straight question. Besides, at $2/W, who needs this? FSLR has already broken the $1/W threshold.

  • Joshua

    Sorry Warren Reynolds, but it doesn’t really matter if it takes 4x the area(and that 40% efficiency only comes with the BEST solar panels, so they are very expensive) because you can cover so much more of your house or building at a much lower cost. And there are ways to keep paint from peeling, but even if it did peel current solar panels lose at least 5% of their energy production each year, but they cost more. Face it, this is an incredible technology with practically no negative aspects.

  • Joshua

    Sorry Warren Reynolds, but it doesn’t really matter if it takes 4x the area(and that 40% efficiency only comes with the BEST solar panels, so they are very expensive) because you can cover so much more of your house or building at a much lower cost. And there are ways to keep paint from peeling, but even if it did peel current solar panels lose at least 5% of their energy production each year, but they cost more. Face it, this is an incredible technology with practically no negative aspects.

  • Nanno technology paint precautions in application to

    metal roofs.

  • Nanno technology paint precautions in application to

    metal roofs.

  • We are already working with Wisconsin, Michigan, and California at the highest levels to solidify interest/roll out and regulatory planning. Thank you for your note. Our next targets are Florida, Alaska, Texas, Illinois, Virginia, Seattle. More to come as we progress now at the testing/readiness center.

    doug linman

    Suntco,

    california

    dlinman@suntco.com

  • We are already working with Wisconsin, Michigan, and California at the highest levels to solidify interest/roll out and regulatory planning. Thank you for your note. Our next targets are Florida, Alaska, Texas, Illinois, Virginia, Seattle. More to come as we progress now at the testing/readiness center.

    doug linman

    Suntco,

    california

    dlinman@suntco.com

  • Simply, our details are our trade business and thus are not for public display as normal. We provide ample data on the website and the coming update will also display what we can responsibly discuss in open forum. Your research may have certainly provided ample tecnological hints. As a scientist or engineer you would rapidly recognize the list of potential considerations toward any design. This part took us years to sort through and perfect. Good hunting!

  • Simply, our details are our trade business and thus are not for public display as normal. We provide ample data on the website and the coming update will also display what we can responsibly discuss in open forum. Your research may have certainly provided ample tecnological hints. As a scientist or engineer you would rapidly recognize the list of potential considerations toward any design. This part took us years to sort through and perfect. Good hunting!

  • Rishiddh A. Jhaveri

    Sir,

    I have been searching on solar paints for a long time and have read some articles on it. But still I haven’t understood how does it work. As you said in your article “excited molecules release an electron into an electron collector and circuit (nanocrystalline titanium dioxide). Finally, the electrons move back into the dye.” What is the electron collector & how is the generated electricity utilized. Is it through the metal sheet? And why does the electrons have to go back into the dye. Can you please explain the working of this cell or can tell me some site where I can find it all.

    Thank you.

  • Rishiddh A. Jhaveri

    Sir,

    I have been searching on solar paints for a long time and have read some articles on it. But still I haven’t understood how does it work. As you said in your article “excited molecules release an electron into an electron collector and circuit (nanocrystalline titanium dioxide). Finally, the electrons move back into the dye.” What is the electron collector & how is the generated electricity utilized. Is it through the metal sheet? And why does the electrons have to go back into the dye. Can you please explain the working of this cell or can tell me some site where I can find it all.

    Thank you.

  • we are entering our product assembly and testing phase for our solar paint and coating work. The note I received was correct, we are fusing the electrochemical portion with the nanotechnology portion to arrive at our solution. The efficiencies there will be considerable, in the hundreds of percents greater than a typical solar panel. After this is verified in field tests then our only issue will be material degradation over time. We can get to 25 years, but feel 15-20 years, before a new application is required, would be more practicable. Once everything is complete, the simple ROI mathematics would be in the 3 years range or less.

  • we are entering our product assembly and testing phase for our solar paint and coating work. The note I received was correct, we are fusing the electrochemical portion with the nanotechnology portion to arrive at our solution. The efficiencies there will be considerable, in the hundreds of percents greater than a typical solar panel. After this is verified in field tests then our only issue will be material degradation over time. We can get to 25 years, but feel 15-20 years, before a new application is required, would be more practicable. Once everything is complete, the simple ROI mathematics would be in the 3 years range or less.

  • We have a letter on the level of testing and the publication of results.

    Regulators will require extensive testing of our solar paint and coatings products especially due to the recent crackdown on harmful solar panel material degradation and their negative conribution to the air and environment. We have planned for this as part of industry and consumer acceptance requirements. We have no visible structural material since we deploy our solar paint and imbedded conductive circuitry as the final solution. The active elements, once fused, form a new compound that degrades slowly over 20-25 years and is expected to remain “green” friendly during that time course until re-applied. Thank you again.

  • We have a letter on the level of testing and the publication of results.

    Regulators will require extensive testing of our solar paint and coatings products especially due to the recent crackdown on harmful solar panel material degradation and their negative conribution to the air and environment. We have planned for this as part of industry and consumer acceptance requirements. We have no visible structural material since we deploy our solar paint and imbedded conductive circuitry as the final solution. The active elements, once fused, form a new compound that degrades slowly over 20-25 years and is expected to remain “green” friendly during that time course until re-applied. Thank you again.

  • Yes, thank you for your note. We believe we can now get under $2/Watt towards that $1/Watt mark but how should it be calculated? As a comparative study if you conclude your research using “solar panel math” as applied, it appears to be highly variable, mathematically speaking, and somewhat jaded towards certain manufacturers applications. So we will have to promote a more standards based model for solar liquid coating and paint that normalizes the most significant factors causing possibly a more accurate comparision, or simply seek to stablize the proper equations for use enveloping solar liquid paint and coating consumer and business applications. SuntCo is certainly addressing this issue for our solar paint and coatings products.

  • Yes, thank you for your note. We believe we can now get under $2/Watt towards that $1/Watt mark but how should it be calculated? As a comparative study if you conclude your research using “solar panel math” as applied, it appears to be highly variable, mathematically speaking, and somewhat jaded towards certain manufacturers applications. So we will have to promote a more standards based model for solar liquid coating and paint that normalizes the most significant factors causing possibly a more accurate comparision, or simply seek to stablize the proper equations for use enveloping solar liquid paint and coating consumer and business applications. SuntCo is certainly addressing this issue for our solar paint and coatings products.

  • One letter today was very interesting in that it had a problem where our solution was sought under harsh conditions. Since we have not physcially attempted to use our solar liquid coating on the roof and also solar paint a house to support the homes’ full energy requirement operating under several inches of snow yet, I was stumped. All I can say right now is that we promise to add this test and will publish the results. We already have a commitment to test homes in Madison, Wisconsin and Troy, Michigan so maybe we will discover something there. We recognize the problem does exists in some areas with no clear solution. The request will be undertaken. Thank You!

  • One letter today was very interesting in that it had a problem where our solution was sought under harsh conditions. Since we have not physcially attempted to use our solar liquid coating on the roof and also solar paint a house to support the homes’ full energy requirement operating under several inches of snow yet, I was stumped. All I can say right now is that we promise to add this test and will publish the results. We already have a commitment to test homes in Madison, Wisconsin and Troy, Michigan so maybe we will discover something there. We recognize the problem does exists in some areas with no clear solution. The request will be undertaken. Thank You!

  • Yes, thank you again for the recent mails. We have pending our SLC or solar liquid coating (paint)that will go into field trials this year. It will be over 250% more efficient than solar panels and expected to reduce the price per watt to less than $2.00. There will no longer be an eye sore structure required and you will be able to send your excess power back to the grid and live on earned credits instead of growing capacity costs. It is our hope, goal and plan that the “utility world” will see these efforts in direct support to a “conservation” solution versus an endless capacity and infrastucture growth approach. Consumers will directly benefit with low or No electrical bill and the grid will be reverse supported with more capacity arriving from high efficent home adn business painted solutions providing more capacity and availability growth without extensive, uncontrolled and costly upgrades passed onto to consumers. Thank you again for all your letters. dlinman@suntco.com

  • Yes, thank you again for the recent mails. We have pending our SLC or solar liquid coating (paint)that will go into field trials this year. It will be over 250% more efficient than solar panels and expected to reduce the price per watt to less than $2.00. There will no longer be an eye sore structure required and you will be able to send your excess power back to the grid and live on earned credits instead of growing capacity costs. It is our hope, goal and plan that the “utility world” will see these efforts in direct support to a “conservation” solution versus an endless capacity and infrastucture growth approach. Consumers will directly benefit with low or No electrical bill and the grid will be reverse supported with more capacity arriving from high efficent home adn business painted solutions providing more capacity and availability growth without extensive, uncontrolled and costly upgrades passed onto to consumers. Thank you again for all your letters. dlinman@suntco.com

  • I was asked about the expected price per Watt for a true consumer solar paint deployment that we might accomplish at SUNTCO. In our skunkworks approach to this issue we specified in our design the use of radiant energy and resulting converted power to be highly efficient as a requirement over any solar panel application, that we near the under $2dollar/WATT mark in our work to present a business achievable goal.

    Dr. Doug Linman, CTO

    SUNTCO

    dlinman@suntco.com

  • I was asked about the expected price per Watt for a true consumer solar paint deployment that we might accomplish at SUNTCO. In our skunkworks approach to this issue we specified in our design the use of radiant energy and resulting converted power to be highly efficient as a requirement over any solar panel application, that we near the under $2dollar/WATT mark in our work to present a business achievable goal.

    Dr. Doug Linman, CTO

    SUNTCO

    dlinman@suntco.com

  • Michael

    Where can I buy Solar Paint

    Cuurve LLC

    1288 Summit Ave. Ste. 107-127

    Oconomowoc, WI. 53066

    262-951-1336

    mdefever@gmail.com

  • Michael

    Where can I buy Solar Paint

    Cuurve LLC

    1288 Summit Ave. Ste. 107-127

    Oconomowoc, WI. 53066

    262-951-1336

    mdefever@gmail.com

  • Jean

    Hola.

    I saw in another place in Massachusetts, there is a company producing painted plastic solar panels that take the form you want, not steel sheet.

    Jean

  • Jean

    Hola.

    I saw in another place in Massachusetts, there is a company producing painted plastic solar panels that take the form you want, not steel sheet.

    Jean

  • Jeff Baker

    Solar Paint on Plug-In Vehicles to Boost V2G Two Way Charging

    One of the first mainstream production vehicles with a solar roof panel will be the next generation Toyota Prius due out next Spring. Nissan, VW and numerous other carmakers will offer solar panels on their electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles also. One solar roof panel will only provide a small percentage of the power that todays electric vehicles require. At 20% efficiency (Suniva and Day4 Energy), a solar roof panel could generate up to 270 watts. The panel will be optional and cost under $900. Keep in mind, the cost of solar panels will gradually come down, and the efficiency will gradually go up. Already, there are cheaper and more efficient solar panels being announced. The SunFlake panel, invented by Martin Aagesen who is a PhD from the Nano-Science Center and the Niels Bohr Institute at University of Copenhagen, gets 30% efficiency and will be cheaper than current panels. Innovalight claims they have a solar panel that is 44% efficient at one tenth the cost. At the rate that solar technology is advancing, solar roof panels on vehicles will soon be over 500 watts. The next technology, coming 3 to 5 years from now, is SOLAR PAINT, that will generate solarvoltaic power from the vehicle body, from any direction. This too has the potential to double the wattage again, but from twice the surface area. So we will be up to 2000 watts under ideal conditions (less depending on the angle of the sun and weather conditions).

    Recently, Toyota described the 1/X Concept vehicle, a plug-in hybrid about the size of a Prius, but ONE THIRD the weight, only 926 lbs. With a vehicle that is one third the weight, the mileage doubles from the same wattage. Quantum Sphere announced a breakthrough in their lithium ion batteries that produces FOUR TIMES the capacity from the same size cell. Another breakthrough is an electric motor that uses HALF the amount of energy to perform the same amount of work. With this new electric motor, the mileage doubles again. Search: Thor Power: Revolutionary Electric Motor Design Cuts Energy Use in Half. And with that 2000 watts of solar power, we will not be powering the vehicle motor. We will be powering a generator to pulse charge a pack of individual batteries in rapid succession with a pulse width modulator, many times per second. Search John Bedini and Energenx battery charger. This is a motor-generator with a pulse width modulator charging multiple batteries simultaneously. Scientist Tom Bearden explains that when a battery is pulse charged, it continues to charge for a split second, even after the current is briefly switched off. Then, with the power still off, a second line of current flows out of the battery briefly, if there is a load on it. The next pulse charge should be timed to first allow these second and third responses.

    A large percentage of the coming electric and plug in hybrid vehicles will be charged at night, when the rates are low, then driven to work and parked all day. If you live in a sunny location, the big pay-off will be Vehicle to Grid (V2G). This concept was originally conceived to transfer a portion of cheap off peak power from your batteries into the daytime peak load grid. You would drive to work, park your car at a V2G receptacle, plug in and tell your car how much power to sell to the grid. Then when you got off work, you would have enough juice left to get home. This was before V2G engineers realized that future vehicles would also be equipped with solar panels or covered with solar paint. With lighter vehicles coming, with high capacity batteries and ultracapacitors, with advanced battery chargers, with vehicle bodies covered with solar paint, a whole new world will open up. Your vehicle will generate 2000 watts of power, either for charging your batteries to move you down the road, or to feed power into the grid at peak load rates while your vehicle is parked. Then you would get a lot of credits on your electric bill. All of this will eventually become a standard feature financed into the vehicle, and it will pay for itself. As a last resort, if your juice was running low, you would plug into the V2G system and charge your batteries from the grid. The power will go both ways. Feed electric power into the grid for credits, or draw power out as debits on your electric bill.

    Solar panels, solar glass, and solar paint on vehicles will soon contribute power to your vehicle and to the local grid using V2G. Visualize whole parking lots of solar equipped electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, capable of feeding the grid, charging, or generating power on the fly. The vehicles of the future will be portable power plants, and their owners will manage energy from solar paint.

  • Jeff Baker

    Solar Paint on Plug-In Vehicles to Boost V2G Two Way Charging

    One of the first mainstream production vehicles with a solar roof panel will be the next generation Toyota Prius due out next Spring. Nissan, VW and numerous other carmakers will offer solar panels on their electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles also. One solar roof panel will only provide a small percentage of the power that todays electric vehicles require. At 20% efficiency (Suniva and Day4 Energy), a solar roof panel could generate up to 270 watts. The panel will be optional and cost under $900. Keep in mind, the cost of solar panels will gradually come down, and the efficiency will gradually go up. Already, there are cheaper and more efficient solar panels being announced. The SunFlake panel, invented by Martin Aagesen who is a PhD from the Nano-Science Center and the Niels Bohr Institute at University of Copenhagen, gets 30% efficiency and will be cheaper than current panels. Innovalight claims they have a solar panel that is 44% efficient at one tenth the cost. At the rate that solar technology is advancing, solar roof panels on vehicles will soon be over 500 watts. The next technology, coming 3 to 5 years from now, is SOLAR PAINT, that will generate solarvoltaic power from the vehicle body, from any direction. This too has the potential to double the wattage again, but from twice the surface area. So we will be up to 2000 watts under ideal conditions (less depending on the angle of the sun and weather conditions).

    Recently, Toyota described the 1/X Concept vehicle, a plug-in hybrid about the size of a Prius, but ONE THIRD the weight, only 926 lbs. With a vehicle that is one third the weight, the mileage doubles from the same wattage. Quantum Sphere announced a breakthrough in their lithium ion batteries that produces FOUR TIMES the capacity from the same size cell. Another breakthrough is an electric motor that uses HALF the amount of energy to perform the same amount of work. With this new electric motor, the mileage doubles again. Search: Thor Power: Revolutionary Electric Motor Design Cuts Energy Use in Half. And with that 2000 watts of solar power, we will not be powering the vehicle motor. We will be powering a generator to pulse charge a pack of individual batteries in rapid succession with a pulse width modulator, many times per second. Search John Bedini and Energenx battery charger. This is a motor-generator with a pulse width modulator charging multiple batteries simultaneously. Scientist Tom Bearden explains that when a battery is pulse charged, it continues to charge for a split second, even after the current is briefly switched off. Then, with the power still off, a second line of current flows out of the battery briefly, if there is a load on it. The next pulse charge should be timed to first allow these second and third responses.

    A large percentage of the coming electric and plug in hybrid vehicles will be charged at night, when the rates are low, then driven to work and parked all day. If you live in a sunny location, the big pay-off will be Vehicle to Grid (V2G). This concept was originally conceived to transfer a portion of cheap off peak power from your batteries into the daytime peak load grid. You would drive to work, park your car at a V2G receptacle, plug in and tell your car how much power to sell to the grid. Then when you got off work, you would have enough juice left to get home. This was before V2G engineers realized that future vehicles would also be equipped with solar panels or covered with solar paint. With lighter vehicles coming, with high capacity batteries and ultracapacitors, with advanced battery chargers, with vehicle bodies covered with solar paint, a whole new world will open up. Your vehicle will generate 2000 watts of power, either for charging your batteries to move you down the road, or to feed power into the grid at peak load rates while your vehicle is parked. Then you would get a lot of credits on your electric bill. All of this will eventually become a standard feature financed into the vehicle, and it will pay for itself. As a last resort, if your juice was running low, you would plug into the V2G system and charge your batteries from the grid. The power will go both ways. Feed electric power into the grid for credits, or draw power out as debits on your electric bill.

    Solar panels, solar glass, and solar paint on vehicles will soon contribute power to your vehicle and to the local grid using V2G. Visualize whole parking lots of solar equipped electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, capable of feeding the grid, charging, or generating power on the fly. The vehicles of the future will be portable power plants, and their owners will manage energy from solar paint.

  • Andy Olsen

    Someone mentioned other solar technologies are getting near 40% conversion efficiency. But how close are they (and solar paint) to commercial reality and how much of a game changer can they be?

    Solar paint’s obvious manufacturing strengths could be a game changer helping us ramp up solar production faster. But how soon can the tech be market ready?

  • Andy Olsen

    Someone mentioned other solar technologies are getting near 40% conversion efficiency. But how close are they (and solar paint) to commercial reality and how much of a game changer can they be?

    Solar paint’s obvious manufacturing strengths could be a game changer helping us ramp up solar production faster. But how soon can the tech be market ready?

  • Arush Choudhary

    Hi Folks,

    This paint would create wonder in developing countries like mine(India) I remember that around 12-15 years back there was no electrical supply where my uncle from my mothers side were staying. Today too I am sure that there quite many places in our country who are aware about electrical energy but dont have physical access to this due to various reason. The most important being shortage of electricity being produced. People in such region have been using various kinds of machine which run on fossil fuel to enhance their agricultural use but I am sure that this shall be replaced if this technology is introduced here.

    The efficiency shall not matter much as demand is so high that availability shall matter more and further generation of this paint can be introduced as the technology develops.

  • Arush Choudhary

    Hi Folks,

    This paint would create wonder in developing countries like mine(India) I remember that around 12-15 years back there was no electrical supply where my uncle from my mothers side were staying. Today too I am sure that there quite many places in our country who are aware about electrical energy but dont have physical access to this due to various reason. The most important being shortage of electricity being produced. People in such region have been using various kinds of machine which run on fossil fuel to enhance their agricultural use but I am sure that this shall be replaced if this technology is introduced here.

    The efficiency shall not matter much as demand is so high that availability shall matter more and further generation of this paint can be introduced as the technology develops.

  • dr. Douglas Linman

    I have been involved in solar paint refinement for a number of years and while, yes paint peels, and other matters that might cause one to pause, it remains a fact more efficient than any solar panel, less costly and highly efficient in the $5/kwh range versus the $7 to $9Kwh range, is nearly maintenance free other than “touch up”, does not require a wing to be structurally mounted on any roof, avoids costly insurance matters, and should last about 20 years before you must resurface and repaint/coat. I am sure most people know by now that Solar Panels are terribly inefficient, breakdown a lot, look terrible as a design concept, are way over priced, and structually fall apart in disrepair in much shorter time frames. The world is moving forward in many ways, this technology will now quickly advance to help our growing alternative energy needs. We are now at the field trial demo stage, our implementation is a complete coating for maximum efficiency, 100% American made (no outsourcing) and very close to near future public release(under 36 months).

  • dr. Douglas Linman

    I have been involved in solar paint refinement for a number of years and while, yes paint peels, and other matters that might cause one to pause, it remains a fact more efficient than any solar panel, less costly and highly efficient in the $5/kwh range versus the $7 to $9Kwh range, is nearly maintenance free other than “touch up”, does not require a wing to be structurally mounted on any roof, avoids costly insurance matters, and should last about 20 years before you must resurface and repaint/coat. I am sure most people know by now that Solar Panels are terribly inefficient, breakdown a lot, look terrible as a design concept, are way over priced, and structually fall apart in disrepair in much shorter time frames. The world is moving forward in many ways, this technology will now quickly advance to help our growing alternative energy needs. We are now at the field trial demo stage, our implementation is a complete coating for maximum efficiency, 100% American made (no outsourcing) and very close to near future public release(under 36 months).

  • Doug Linman, Ph.D

    We too have been concluded our patented work on our Solar Liquid Energy coating, or solar paint, which we started in 2007. This year and future few months will be focused on final field trials and metering our advances by collecting and transmitting data directly from test installations and transmitting that data to us automatically 24×7 for data gathering. We wish you great success in your work as well. The world needs our types of solutions.

    Very Best

    Doug Linman, Ph.D.

    SUNTCO

    CTO

    +1 925 548 4036

  • Doug Linman, Ph.D

    We too have been concluded our patented work on our Solar Liquid Energy coating, or solar paint, which we started in 2007. This year and future few months will be focused on final field trials and metering our advances by collecting and transmitting data directly from test installations and transmitting that data to us automatically 24×7 for data gathering. We wish you great success in your work as well. The world needs our types of solutions.

    Very Best

    Doug Linman, Ph.D.

    SUNTCO

    CTO

    +1 925 548 4036

  • Duncan
  • Duncan
  • there are companies already developing this. Xerocoat in Australia and Nanosolar in the US

  • there are companies already developing this. Xerocoat in Australia and Nanosolar in the US

  • W Dan Chance

    Refinements of solar technology are coming almost too fast for the market to incorporate them into installable systems. One such refinement has recently been announced by Konarka. Konarka’s list of international corporate partners is as impressive as it’s nanosolar technology with 280 patents.

    The Konarka nanosolar technology is NOT 3rd generation silicon based solar cell technology, which converts ONLY infared photon light wavelengths, has only a 15% to 17% photon energy conversion efficiency and a manufacturing cost of $3.25 to $5.85 per watt.

    Konarka Nanosolar cell panels are printed on flex-plastic ( up to 10 mils thick ), converts the ENTIRE spectrum of photon light wavelengths, has an 80% photon energy conversion efficiency and a mass production manufacturing cost of approximately $0.10 per watt.

    A typical three bedroom home using 3rd generation silicon based solar cell technology, would require a minimum 3 kWp system and cost about $17,000. A Konarka Nanosolar system of the same size would only run $300. (Affordable for everyone).

    It might be worth checking it out: Konarka Nanosolar Technologies: http://www.konarka.com

  • W Dan Chance

    Refinements of solar technology are coming almost too fast for the market to incorporate them into installable systems. One such refinement has recently been announced by Konarka. Konarka’s list of international corporate partners is as impressive as it’s nanosolar technology with 280 patents.

    The Konarka nanosolar technology is NOT 3rd generation silicon based solar cell technology, which converts ONLY infared photon light wavelengths, has only a 15% to 17% photon energy conversion efficiency and a manufacturing cost of $3.25 to $5.85 per watt.

    Konarka Nanosolar cell panels are printed on flex-plastic ( up to 10 mils thick ), converts the ENTIRE spectrum of photon light wavelengths, has an 80% photon energy conversion efficiency and a mass production manufacturing cost of approximately $0.10 per watt.

    A typical three bedroom home using 3rd generation silicon based solar cell technology, would require a minimum 3 kWp system and cost about $17,000. A Konarka Nanosolar system of the same size would only run $300. (Affordable for everyone).

    It might be worth checking it out: Konarka Nanosolar Technologies: http://www.konarka.com

  • Warren Reynolds

    Sir: 11% efficient is not very excity when others are around 40% now. So, it takes 4x the area to get the same kwatts. Paint also peels.

    There is the same approach as this one on plastic film. So, this is a copy of existing developments.

  • Warren Reynolds

    Sir: 11% efficient is not very excity when others are around 40% now. So, it takes 4x the area to get the same kwatts. Paint also peels.

    There is the same approach as this one on plastic film. So, this is a copy of existing developments.

  • ed rabon

    i wonder if it will come in clear as i could just skip the solar panels and paint my shingles with it then id just have to figure out how to connect the leads to it

  • ed rabon

    i wonder if it will come in clear as i could just skip the solar panels and paint my shingles with it then id just have to figure out how to connect the leads to it

  • Robert Mayer

    One thing… since it’s applied to steel, it’s not like mass production for regular consumption would allow us to paint our wood/brick/concrete houses with it. Unfortunately. Though painting every NYC skyscraper would probably have good effects. I hope it comes in a variety of colors 🙂

  • Robert Mayer

    One thing… since it’s applied to steel, it’s not like mass production for regular consumption would allow us to paint our wood/brick/concrete houses with it. Unfortunately. Though painting every NYC skyscraper would probably have good effects. I hope it comes in a variety of colors 🙂

  • SANJOSEMIKE

    If electrons move from one area to another area, that is the definition of electrical current.

    One can apply a wire at one location where the electrons move, and another wire at the other side.

    Perhaps the “covering” layer is just a conductor. That’s all they really need. The conductor could be embedded in the upper layer of the paint itself. The lower conductor is the steel sheet.

    I would be willing to bet anyone here that this is how they do it.

    Solar power as a paint will ultimately reduce the cost of solar energy, even if it is not as efficient as “regular” solar panels. After all, it is just a paint. Paints are easily amenable to mass produced manufacture and application.

    sanjosemike

  • SANJOSEMIKE

    If electrons move from one area to another area, that is the definition of electrical current.

    One can apply a wire at one location where the electrons move, and another wire at the other side.

    Perhaps the “covering” layer is just a conductor. That’s all they really need. The conductor could be embedded in the upper layer of the paint itself. The lower conductor is the steel sheet.

    I would be willing to bet anyone here that this is how they do it.

    Solar power as a paint will ultimately reduce the cost of solar energy, even if it is not as efficient as “regular” solar panels. After all, it is just a paint. Paints are easily amenable to mass produced manufacture and application.

    sanjosemike

  • OK, so I’ve spotted the lower conductor for the cell -that’s the steel sheet. But what forms the top layer conductor? You need a second conductor to complete the circuit and get the power out. They’re a bit quiet on that one.

    Vik :v)

  • OK, so I’ve spotted the lower conductor for the cell -that’s the steel sheet. But what forms the top layer conductor? You need a second conductor to complete the circuit and get the power out. They’re a bit quiet on that one.

    Vik :v)

  • OK, so I can see the bottom conductor – that’s the steel sheet. But what forms the top conductor? No top conductor – nothing to connect that second wire to for extracting the power.

    Vik :v)

  • OK, so I can see the bottom conductor – that’s the steel sheet. But what forms the top conductor? No top conductor – nothing to connect that second wire to for extracting the power.

    Vik :v)

  • M3

    And the naysayers said it wasn ‘t possible… Score for the alternative energy optomists!

    Watch current solar panels become dirt cheap…lol OWNED!

  • M3

    And the naysayers said it wasn ‘t possible… Score for the alternative energy optomists!

    Watch current solar panels become dirt cheap…lol OWNED!

  • Tim

    I think the method they are using to bring cost down is not only in the materials used but also the process. They are using a printing technique very similar to printing newspapers. I really can’t wait to see this on the open market. As well as I heard that they are able to use the infrared spectrum of the sun ray, which is about 50% of the sun ray. Let me know if I’m incorret though.

  • Tim

    I think the method they are using to bring cost down is not only in the materials used but also the process. They are using a printing technique very similar to printing newspapers. I really can’t wait to see this on the open market. As well as I heard that they are able to use the infrared spectrum of the sun ray, which is about 50% of the sun ray. Let me know if I’m incorret though.

  • Ariel Schwartz

    Nils – the original source speculates that the solar point should be cheap since it doesn’t require silicon, but doesn’t mention specific numbers.

  • Wow! This is pretty cool. Did the original source mention any cost projections or comparisons to other PV technologies?

    This is the type of thing that I think will enable solar PV to have a Moore’s Law-like improvement in price-performance. Right now we think of solar PV as all about silicon (or CIGS), but solar PV paint could change the game. Technology improvements in the collection itself (efficiency and manufacturing of the collectors, or simply painting them onto other surfaces) get us the first factor of ten price reduction. Combine these with other types of innovations – such as using this painted metal as roofing material, so it serves two purposes – get us another factor of two-to-five. With storage technologies to solve the “baseload” problem – if the PV collection is cheap, I can live with inefficient (and heavy – e.g., batteries in my basement) storage, as long as it too is cheap.

    Nils

  • Wow! This is pretty cool. Did the original source mention any cost projections or comparisons to other PV technologies?

    This is the type of thing that I think will enable solar PV to have a Moore’s Law-like improvement in price-performance. Right now we think of solar PV as all about silicon (or CIGS), but solar PV paint could change the game. Technology improvements in the collection itself (efficiency and manufacturing of the collectors, or simply painting them onto other surfaces) get us the first factor of ten price reduction. Combine these with other types of innovations – such as using this painted metal as roofing material, so it serves two purposes – get us another factor of two-to-five. With storage technologies to solve the “baseload” problem – if the PV collection is cheap, I can live with inefficient (and heavy – e.g., batteries in my basement) storage, as long as it too is cheap.

    Nils

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