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Published on March 29th, 2014 | by Jo Borrás

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Electric Vehicle Concept Could Drive In Floods

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March 29th, 2014 by
 

Originally published on Gas2.

Fomm Waterproof Electric Car

In a world with rapidly melting polar ice and rising sea levelsyou want to be sure your car can still, you know, car in the event that you wake up and there’s 3 feet of water covering the streets of your neighborhood. If that seems like a reasonable sentence to you, then, buddy — have I got your car! It’s called the Fomm, and it’s here to keep you motoring through even the nastiest urban floods.

Really.

Fomm Waterproof Electric Car

For their part, the guys behind the Fomm concept developed a power train for their little fjord-forder, using purpose-built in-wheel electric motors placed within each of the front wheels of the “Concept One” show car. Each motor develops about 280Nm (or 205 lb-ft) of torque, giving the 1000 lb. buggy a massive 400+ lb. ft of torque (!!). Once the floodwaters rise, the Fomm gets around using a water-jet system similar to those employed by JetSkis.

To be totally fair, the silly little car buit to avoid rising sea levels actually does has a serious purpose: ferrying people in and out of cities in SouthEast Asia that are prone to heavy flooding and tsunamis. If it works, it’ll be a fantastic thing out there — but until someone actually sees it work, I’ll keep calling Fomm’s Concept One the Waterworld of future car concepts.

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  • fomm-interior
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Source | Photos: TechVehi.

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About the Author

I've been involved in motorsports and tuning since 1997, and write for a number of blogs in the Important Media network. You can find me on Twitter, Skype (jo.borras) or Google+.



  • Peter Gray

    Cute, but yes, silly. I’m glad to see the writer exercise a little well-justified skepticism. Please keep it up and extend it. The only thing new about this concept is the electric component. I remember seeing a couple of amphibious cars when I was a small child, all too many decades ago.
    They failed then and they will fail now, for the same reasons there will never be a market for flying cars. No matter the technology, it will always be impossible to design one vehicle that’s an excellent car and an excellent boat. This invention and its various cousins should be firmly identified as scams, and then ignored. Promoting this as a solution for poor, flood-prone areas in SE Asia is worse than deceptive; it’s shameful.

    If you have a spare $135k, you can already buy a gasoline water-car (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2354502/Water-way-drive-The-worlds-fastest-amphibious-vehicle-car-boat-just-15-SECONDS.html), but for much less cash you could get a car and a boat separately that will each outperform the water-car by huge margins. Adding a load of batteries can only make things worse.

    Here’s another clue that this thing is a bogus scam: their highlighting the supposedly impressive (oops, “massive”) 400+ lb-ft of torque. So what? I can put out the same torque with my body for a short time… …at 5 or 6 RPM, or for longer at 2 RPM. Torque alone tells us nothing about power. A blogger involved in motorsports for 17 years should have spotted that one.

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