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Agriculture UGE Whole Foods 2

Published on December 25th, 2013 | by Zachary Shahan

2

Whole Foods In Brooklyn Is *Jacked Up* On Cleantech

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December 25th, 2013 by Zachary Shahan
 

A new Whole Foods Market store in Brooklyn is totally jacked up on cleantech, as well as other cool stuff. It includes:

  • 19 UGE solar/wind-powered street lights (completely off the grid)
  • 2 wind-powered electric vehicle (EV) charging stations
  • 360kW solar car port (installed by a local financier)

UGE Whole Foods 2

UGE Whole Foods 3

whole foods brooklyn cleantech


whole foods brooklynUsing distributed renewable energy (DRE) for charging electric vehicles comes with a few notable benefits (other than being clean), as UGE notes:

  • Powering EV chargers with onsite DRE is more efficient than through the grid due to minimal grid losses in transmission
  • Adding DRE to EV charging can add resiliency in the case of grid outages

Furthermore, the prominently placed EV chargers help to promote EV adoption. Naturally, Whole Foods is all about influencing consumer choice in a green way.

“We’re about 60% more efficient than any other grocery store in the United States. We’re going to be saving about 2.5 million kWh a year, which is equivalent to taking about 360 cars off the road annually. In addition to our combined heat and power system…we’ve incorporated Skypumps that use wind and solar energy to power electric vehicle charging stations. These same wind and solar technologies are also used to power our light poles. When you shop at Whole Foods Third and 3rd what you’ll feel is our commitment to supporting and advancing environmental stewardship,” Tristam Coffin & J’aime Mitchell of the Whole Foods Market Green Mission Team state.

The wind-powered EV charging stations (UGE Sanya Skypumps) combine UGE vertical-axis micro wind turbines with GE WattStations. Since UGE is the company that passed along this news about the Whole Foods Market Brooklyn opening, and since it’s doing some pretty cool stuff, I’ll go ahead and share a few more facts about the company with you:

World leader in DRE with installations in over 80 countries

  • Complete DRE solution provider for enterprise customers, from solar PPAs to microgrids, a leader in both powering telecoms towers and street lighting, and the undisputed world leader in vertical axis wind turbines
  • Leading partner to Fortune 500 companies, with ongoing relationships with JPMorgan, Whole Foods, Ford, BMW, GE and many additional global brands
  • Collaborative culture, focused on forming long lasting relationships and our core values Be Green, Be Great, Have Fun

Good stuff. We need a lot more of this!

All images via UGE.

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About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.



  • neighbor

    The store expects more than a thousand car trips per day. Even if
    the new “renewable” energy source is equivalent to removing 360 cars
    from the streets, the desire to buy food from the store will indeed be
    generating far more car trips on our streets that are currently
    occurring since most people walk to local shops near where they live.

    The planning, specifically the location, of this store is not
    environmentally friendly because it brings a form of suburban
    consumption, based on auto travel, to an urban community that is not
    based around cars. The benefits of organic foods are not worth such a
    huge step backwards for the environment that this store has imposed on
    Brooklyn.

    You just don’t get to removing those imagined 360 cars from the streets by generating greater need to use a car.

  • Matt

    Love their parking lot PV. Not only does it make electric, your car will not so hot when you come out of the store. Would be a easy zoning change to get your town green. For new buildings, at least 50% of your parking lot must be covered in PV. Can apply for exception based on extreme shading.

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