CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world.


Cars kia soul

Published on May 24th, 2013 | by Nicholas Brown

3

Kia Soul EV — $35,000 With A 120-Mile Range?

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

May 24th, 2013 by
 
Remember the car advertisement in which the Kia Soul was driven by hamsters? That was for the original gasoline-powered Kia Soul, with a tag line “a new way to roll.” Well, now, the company is looking to offer a really new way to roll.

kia soul

Kia Soul (not EV).
Image Credit: Kia

Kia is expected to release an electric version of this car in 2014, so the hamsters can roll silently and efficiently!

Obviously, there won’t be any hamsters driving it, but it is expected to travel 120 miles per charge, and cost $35,000.

The electric Soul is supposed to be “the first electric vehicle for the global market,” unlike the rest, which are usually sold only in Europe, the United States, and Japan. Naturally, however, Nissan might have a bit of beef about that line.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , ,


About the Author

writes on CleanTechnica, Gas2, Kleef&Co, and Green Building Elements. He has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, and geography. His website is: Kompulsa.com.



  • AaronD12

    I thought the hamsters were under the hood, not behind the wheel…

  • Ronald Brak

    The competition is increasing, which is good news. I wonder if “vehicle for the global market” means it is designed to accept European current, but can accept weaker Japanese/North American current without problem if that’s all that’s available or are they producing slightly different models for regions with different electrical standards? Or is it just something marketing came up with?

    • Otis11

      “Or is it just something marketing came up with?”

      That’d be my guess…

Back to Top ↑