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Air Quality 20090723-score-cookstove

Published on July 24th, 2009 | by Ariel Schwartz

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SCORE: A Cookstove That Generates Electricity

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July 24th, 2009 by
 

Those of us who don’t live in developing countries might not always remember that the majority of the world still uses biomass-fired cookstoves that produce smoke and other toxins. It’s a serious problem–indoor air pollution kills 1.6 million people yearly. Enter the SCORE (Stove for Cooking, Refrigeration, and Electricity), a $33 cookstove developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham that doubles as an electrical generator.

SCORE works by converting heat into acoustic energy, which is in turn converted into electricity with a linear alternator. The stove, which is ultimately expected to weigh between 10-20 kilograms, uses a single kilogram of fuel (i.e. wood or dung) each hour of use. SCORE reduces overall fuel use compared to other cookstoves by three times thanks to improved efficiency.

Researchers are currently conducting field trials in Nepal, and hope to have SCORE on the market soon after 2012. The product already has some competition, though–the $25 Envirofit clean-burning stove. Envirofit‘s stove doesn’t produce electricity, but it’s cheaper and is already on sale in India. As with Envirofit’s model, the SCORE will likely pay for itself in under a year because of fuel efficiency–not to mention the countless deaths averted by minimized smoke inhalation.

Via Treehugger

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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • Hasmukhjain18

    please mail me details of this product at
    hasmukhjain18@gmail.com

  • http://www.stovetec.net Ben West

    Wow, these are two great concepts! Going from engineering and manufacturing to distribution and adoption will obviously be key to creating social, environmental and economic impacts. We have another technology that cooks in 2nd and 3rd world areas adopt that also cuts wood use in half and is 70% cleaner. Check us out at: http://www.stovetec.net and let us know how we can help!

  • http://www.stovetec.net Ben West

    Wow, these are two great concepts! Going from engineering and manufacturing to distribution and adoption will obviously be key to creating social, environmental and economic impacts. We have another technology that cooks in 2nd and 3rd world areas adopt that also cuts wood use in half and is 70% cleaner. Check us out at: http://www.stovetec.net and let us know how we can help!

  • http://www.stovetec.net Ben West

    Wow, these are two great concepts! Going from engineering and manufacturing to distribution and adoption will obviously be key to creating social, environmental and economic impacts. We have another technology that cooks in 2nd and 3rd world areas adopt that also cuts wood use in half and is 70% cleaner. Check us out at: http://www.stovetec.net and let us know how we can help!

  • olabinjo muyiwa

    well in some part of afica this will be very usefull because in some african country they still use the woods and coal which still cause polution, and with this kind of stove the pollutions they cause with the woods would reduce, so i thinks it a nice work for you guys. keep it up. and expect my too very soon somthung better.

  • olabinjo muyiwa

    well in some part of afica this will be very usefull because in some african country they still use the woods and coal which still cause polution, and with this kind of stove the pollutions they cause with the woods would reduce, so i thinks it a nice work for you guys. keep it up. and expect my too very soon somthung better.

  • http://storyofstuff.com Hann

    I want one. haha.

    XVX for life, R.A.S.H. ’til death.

  • http://storyofstuff.com Hann

    I want one. haha.

    XVX for life, R.A.S.H. ’til death.

  • http://storyofstuff.com Hann

    I want one. haha.

    XVX for life, R.A.S.H. ’til death.

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    We rarely think about stove technology in the United States, but in many countries it represents a significant cause of pollution, as well as a health hazard. It’s encouraging to see technology advance in an area that is low profile to the developed world, yet vital to millions.

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    We rarely think about stove technology in the United States, but in many countries it represents a significant cause of pollution, as well as a health hazard. It’s encouraging to see technology advance in an area that is low profile to the developed world, yet vital to millions.

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    We rarely think about stove technology in the United States, but in many countries it represents a significant cause of pollution, as well as a health hazard. It’s encouraging to see technology advance in an area that is low profile to the developed world, yet vital to millions.

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