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Browsing the "communication" Tag

A Message To The Tesla Community

November 4th, 2019 | by Johnna Crider

I saw a thread on Twitter with a message to the Tesla community that I think needs to be taken to the next level. It's a thread from Bonnie Norman, a Tesla shareholder and Tesla owner. Bonnie is reminding us that our actions matter, too. Every tweet, every action, every interaction we have online — it matters


Tesla Model 3 In Australia: How Does It Compete?

September 13th, 2019 | by Johnna Crider

Tesla just recently introduced the Model 3 to Australia, on the first of September. How does the Model 3 compete in Australia? Media outlets in Australia are already reporting sales in the thousands, but initial sales don't necessarily signify competitiveness. Or do they


Climate Change & Metaphors: A Primer

February 16th, 2019 | by Michael Barnard

We have majority acceptance of the science, the remaining deniers are pretty motivated thinkers and the biggest problem is getting people to see the need for action right now


Nuance vs Simple Messages

August 17th, 2017 | by Zachary Shahan

We're in the business of communications here at CleanTechnica. We have to constantly consider how to communicate in a useful, interesting, and clear way. One topic that comes up practically every day is how to balance simple messages with the extra depth, nuance, and details that create a more complete story


How To Handle Trolls — Cleantech Communication Handbook Coming

June 14th, 2017 | by Zachary Shahan

Working in the cleantech communication business since the middle of 2009, I can say that I've picked up quite a few cleantech communication tips, and I try to sharpen them every day. Unfortunately, I've also seen a lot of examples of bad, bad, bad cleantech communication — communication flubs are quite abundant in this field. (And, yeah, I've been the person behind those bad examples from time to time.) Many cleantech enthusiasts actually use talking points and discussion strategies that are counterproductive. Yikes!



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