Clean Power India Solar Jobs 1 Million

Published on March 23rd, 2016 | by Smiti Mittal

9

India Solar Power Push May Produce Over 1 Million Jobs

March 23rd, 2016 by  

Originally published on Sustainnovate.

Indian Solar Power Target May Create Over 1 Million New Jobs

India’s massive solar power capacity addition target is expected to be a revolution in the Indian jobs market as well.

According to a report by the Natural Resources and Defense Council (NRDC), India may end up creating over a million new jobs in its endeavour to have 100 GW of operational solar power capacity by March 2022.

The report suggests that a massive army of engineers, construction, and maintenance workers shall be required set up the scores of solar power capacity planned by the central and state governments.

Around 210,800 site engineers and designers would be required to set the large-scale as well as rooftop solar power systems rolling. Around 624,600 semi-skilled workers would be needed for the construction and on-field execution of the projects. To monitor ongoing operations at the power plants and their maintenance, another 182,400 semi-skilled workers would be needed. Thus, a total of 1,017,800 jobs are expected be created if India indeed manages to set up a cumulative operational capacity of 100 GW by 2022.

Jobs creation and empowering youth is one of the major policies of the current government. The ‘Skill India’ program launched by the Indian government aims to provide employment to youth by providing them industrial training in the solar power sector. Several agencies across the country have already started such training programs.

Some state governments have also announced financial support to unemployed youth to set up rooftop solar power systems to help them generate a source of income.

 
 
Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.
 
Haven’t taken our 2016 reader survey yet? Do so now!
 

Tags: , , , , ,


About the Author

works as a senior solar engineer at a reputed engineering and management consultancy. She has conducted due diligence of several solar PV projects in India and Southeast Asia. She has keen interest in renewable energy, green buildings, environmental sustainability, and biofuels. She currently resides in New Delhi, India.



  • Jamset

    There must be a lot of solar panel cleaning jobs.

    Most of India and Arabia is dusty.

    Can they find out how many are employed full-time to clean solar panels?

    • Bristolboy

      Cleaning would be included within the O&M jobs.

      Plus there are now “robots” which automatically clean dust, but whether robots make sense in low-wage India is another matter – I recently read coal mines in India use people on push-bikes for transport as it is more economic than buying trucks!

      • Matt

        This is part of the GOP bible, no minimum wage! At low enough wages it is cheaper to have a person hold your papers than buy a paper weight. More so if you can remove all the other costs (health care, worker safety, workmen’s comp, etc).

        • Lon

          Come on Brother, this is exactly the type of comment that adds to the problem of GOP supporters refusing to get behind any action on climate change.
          Because, while the facts/science are clear in supporting anthropogenic global warming and the need for government intervention, there is definitely not clear evidence that a minimum wage substantially helps the poor.
          And while most conservatives try to ignore the laws of global climate rather than deal with it, you apparently wish to ignore the laws of economics and the lack of evidence in favor of minimum wage and just legislate away poverty. Both positions are equally silly.
          Your comment, in addition to being insulting and alienating to any conservative honestly interested in the debate on climate, adds to conservative opinion that if liberals can be in favor of something as counterproductive, politically motivated and scientifically unsupportable as minimum wage, then other issues they support (legislation to stop climate change) must also be based on folly.
          The need for action on the climate is well supported by science and can be considered fact. The benefits of a minimum wage are highly debatable and is therefore opinion.
          I think we should keep politics out of this issue if we ever hope to get conservatives on board.

          • Bob_Wallace

            “the lack of evidence in favor of minimum wage and just legislate away poverty”

            Actually –

            “There is a huge research literature associated with this issue, as detailed below. Among the extended primers worth considering is the 2014 book “What Does the Minimum Wage Do?” by Dale Belman of Michigan State University and Paul Wolfson of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. That work synthesizes some 200 papers. In their conclusion, they write:

            “Evidence leads us to conclude that moderate increases in the minimum wage are a useful means of raising wages in the lower part of the wage distribution that has little or no effect on employment and hours. This is what one seeks in a policy tool, solid benefits with small costs. That said, current research does not speak to whether the same results would hold for large increases in the minimum wage.””

            “, Princeton’s Alan Krueger — now Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers — and his colleague David Card produced a seminal paper that has framed much of the subsequent debate. Those scholars examined the results of a New Jersey law raising the minimum wage, comparing the outcomes in the fast food industry to those in the bordering state of Pennsylvania, where wage laws remained the same. Their study called into question textbook assumptions about how labor markets might work.

            The findings included: The data indicated “no evidence that the rise in New Jersey’s minimum wage reduced employment at fast-food restaurants in the state.” Further, “prices of fast-food meals increased in New Jersey relative to Pennsylvania, suggesting that much of the burden of the minimum-wage rise was passed on to consumers.”

            “2004 study of available literature, “The Effect of Minimum Wage on Prices,” analyzed a wide variety of research on the impact of changes in the minimum wage. The paper, from the University of Leicester, found that firms tend to respond to minimum wage increases not by reducing production or employment, but by raising prices. Overall, price increases are modest: For example, a 10% increase in the minimum wage would increase food prices by no more than 4% and overall prices by no more than 0.4%, significantly less than the minimum-wage increase.”

            http://journalistsresource.org/studies/economics/inequality/the-effects-of-raising-the-minimum-wage#sthash.7qYkAnZf.dpuf

            There’s data, Brother….

          • Bob_Wallace

            “the lack of evidence in favor of minimum wage and just legislate away poverty”

            Actually –

            “There is a huge research literature associated with this issue, as detailed below. Among the extended primers worth considering is the 2014 book “What Does the Minimum Wage Do?” by Dale Belman of Michigan State University and Paul Wolfson of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. That work synthesizes some 200 papers. In their conclusion, they write:

            “Evidence leads us to conclude that moderate increases in the minimum wage are a useful means of raising wages in the lower part of the wage distribution that has little or no effect on employment and hours. This is what one seeks in a policy tool, solid benefits with small costs. That said, current research does not speak to whether the same results would hold for large increases in the minimum wage.””

            “, Princeton’s Alan Krueger — now Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers — and his colleague David Card produced a seminal paper that has framed much of the subsequent debate. Those scholars examined the results of a New Jersey law raising the minimum wage, comparing the outcomes in the fast food industry to those in the bordering state of Pennsylvania, where wage laws remained the same. Their study called into question textbook assumptions about how labor markets might work.

            The findings included: The data indicated “no evidence that the rise in New Jersey’s minimum wage reduced employment at fast-food restaurants in the state.” Further, “prices of fast-food meals increased in New Jersey relative to Pennsylvania, suggesting that much of the burden of the minimum-wage rise was passed on to consumers.”

            “2004 study of available literature, “The Effect of Minimum Wage on Prices,” analyzed a wide variety of research on the impact of changes in the minimum wage. The paper, from the University of Leicester, found that firms tend to respond to minimum wage increases not by reducing production or employment, but by raising prices. Overall, price increases are modest: For example, a 10% increase in the minimum wage would increase food prices by no more than 4% and overall prices by no more than 0.4%, significantly less than the minimum-wage increase.”

            http://journalistsresource.org/studies/economics/inequality/the-effects-of-raising-the-minimum-wage#sthash.7qYkAnZf.dpuf

            There’s data, Brother….

        • Lon

          Come on Brother, this is exactly the type of comment that adds to the problem of GOP supporters refusing to get behind any action on climate change.
          Because, while the facts/science are clear in supporting anthropogenic global warming and the need for government intervention, there is definitely not clear evidence that a minimum wage substantially helps the poor.
          And while most conservatives try to ignore the laws of global climate rather than deal with it, you apparently wish to ignore the laws of economics and the lack of evidence in favor of minimum wage and just legislate away poverty. Both positions are equally silly.
          Your comment, in addition to being insulting and alienating to any conservative honestly interested in the debate on climate, adds to conservative opinion that if liberals can be in favor of something as counterproductive, politically motivated and scientifically unsupportable as minimum wage, then other issues they support (legislation to stop climate change) must also be based on folly.
          The need for action on the climate is well supported by science and can be considered fact. The benefits of a minimum wage are highly debatable and is therefore opinion.
          I think we should keep politics out of this issue if we ever hope to get conservatives on board.

      • Jamset

        The Toyota factory outside Bangalore uses human muscles to push the cars along the production line!

        In rich nations they would use electricity to do that.

  • JamesWimberley

    These are some of the numbers that make the transition irreversible.

Back to Top ↑