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Clean Power uk offshore wind power

Published on August 19th, 2014 | by Joshua S Hill

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UK Wind Generation Records Falling In Blustery August

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August 19th, 2014 by  

First it was the tail end of Hurricane Bertha, now it is just high August winds — either way, the United Kingdom’s onshore and offshore wind turbines met 22% of the country’s electricity demand this past Sunday, setting a new record.

Most impressive, however, is the fact that this figure comfortably outperforms coal, which only met 13% of demand.

RenewableUK, the country’s leading renewable energy trade association, announced the figures on Monday, confirming that they had beaten the previous record set earlier in the month of 21%.

“We’re seeing very high levels of generation from wind throughout August so far, proving yet again that onshore and offshore wind has become an absolutely fundamental component in this country’s energy mix,” RenewableUK’s Director of External Affairs, Jennifer Webber, said. “It also shows that wind is a dependable and reliable source of power in every month of year – including high summer.”

More specifically, Sunday saw the UK’s onshore and offshore wind turbines generate an average of 5,797 MW — enough to power more than 15 million UK homes.

In terms of generating distribution, wind outperformed coal (13%), solar (3%), biomass (3%), and hydro (1%), and competed strongly with nuclear (24%) and gas (26%).

Wind energy has been performing well around the world. Spain, one of the original renewable energy powerhouses, reported that 30% of July’s electricity demand was generated by wind energy. While down here in my home-country of Australia, wind made up 43% of the state of South Australia’s energy demand in July — a figure many of us wish the current government would pay attention to.

As wind energy continues to develop and push its technology, we are going to be seeing more of these figures pop up, and hopefully governments will begin to pay more and more attention to such a dominant energy technology.

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About the Author

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, and I believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.



  • fevasu

    is there a way to truly from grassroots start environmental revolt in US, even at the low point UK wind performance is “not bad”. While Oil mafia is cashing in every tax credit known under the sun

  • Matt

    People forget that it was tax dollars that moved electric outside of big cities. Or all the damns in the country. All the money given to coal and oil over the last 100 years. The wars we have had for oil, or just the ships we keep in the gulf to keep the oil flowing. If we just stop paying coal, oil, NG their big suck. The saving could install PV on all public building in the land. Add in a carbon tax for the $0.5 Trillion damage coal does a year and give it back even split to all federal tax payers (dependents). And the move to green would become a rush.

  • dango-man

    The UK wind production in winter 2013 was impressive but this is just average as wind production only met 22% on a Sunday which is were demand is the lowest in the week which is in the summer were demand is already low.
    Solar however is finally showing results in the UK as 5GW has now been installed and this now showing in the figures were in previous years it has paled in comparison in any other energy source.

    • jeffhre

      “but this is just average as wind production only met 22% on a Sunday which is were demand is the lowest in the week which is in the summer were demand is already low.”

      Reminds me of the kid in school, who whenever he saw someone do something cool would say: “OK but you can’t do it backwards, uphill, against the wind, hanging over the handle bars while you do a somersault from a handstand.”

      • dango-man

        Going back to school? If your going to argue do it directly.
        I’m just pointing out the facts which many people seem happy to ignore and instead look at the “record braking figures” . Every quarter there is record breaking figures as unsurprising there is more capacity being built each quarter. So was this exceptional? No. Like I said the wind was blowing better in winter 2013. Make sense? or should I hold your hand while I take you to the classroom?

        • jeffhre

          Would it change anything? Are you at least cute? Even if your’e not I’ll let you hold my hand if you can set new power generation records going backwards, uphill, against the wind, hanging over the handle bars while you do a somersault from a handstand. Yes, sir, LOL.

          • dango-man

            Waste of time….

          • jeffhre

            I would have to agree, and I believe that I have set the bar quite low.

  • Brian

    Wind, and solar Power are the future of energy production. Had we spent the trillions of dollars we spent on dirty fossil fuels for the last 100 years, Wind, solar, and geothermal power would provide 100% of the USA’s electricity.

    • globi

      The US spends about $3500 per person on energy per year.

      http://energy.gov/maps/2009-energy-expenditure-person
      That’s about $1.1 trillion per year.
      If you invest the energy expenditure of the US for two years in wind farms, you already have a 100% renewable grid.

      (2 years not 100 years – no wonder the fossil fuel industry has its pants full.)

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