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Clean Power US solar PV project pipeline

Published on August 5th, 2014 | by Joshua S Hill

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US Solar PV Project Pipeline In Danger Of Proposed Trade Rulings

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August 5th, 2014 by  

Recent anti-subsidy and anti-dumping rulings proposed by the US Department of Commerce in response to imports of crystalline silicon solar PV cells and modules from China and Taiwan could have massive consequences for the US solar PV project pipeline as a whole.

The latest NPD Solarbuzz United States Deal Tracker shows that more than 3 GW of projects currently in the US PV project pipeline were set to use Chinese modules. But with the preliminary tariffs of 26-165% on Chinese and Taiwanese imports, these projects may be forced to look elsewhere. 

“Large-scale ground-mount PV installations are particularly vulnerable to cost increases and potential disruption, as many have signed power purchase agreements at aggressive rates,” said Michael Barker, senior analyst at NPD Solarbuzz. “Any increase in cost for the projects could mean renegotiation, delay, or even termination.”

US solar PV project pipeline

“Solar PV is rapidly becoming more cost-effective as a power generation source,” said Christine Beadle, analyst at NPD Solarbuzz. “Project developers are swiftly adapting to new market dynamics and are driving strong growth, especially in community and carport systems, but this growth may be interrupted if any external factors increase prices significantly.”

According to PV-Magazine, a number of Chinese PV makers were singled out for special duty rates — including Trina Solar who only received a rate of 26.33%. However, “a list of 42 companies including market leaders Yingli, Canadian Solar and Hanwha SolarOne were assessed at a 42.33% anti-dumping duty rate” with the highest rate for companies not on the Department of Commerce’s list.

While these rulings are preliminary, they are not unexpected, and in the long run could prove devastating to the short-term health of the US solar PV market.

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About the Author

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, and I believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.



  • Brian Donovan

    Hey, China,

    build factories in the USA,

    then Obama and the gov will protect you from world competition like they do for big German SolarWorld.

    Make sure you also contribute to both political parties.

    It’s really that simple.

    Then you can just conjecture that someone is hurting your business and the commerce dept, a agency of the executive branch, Obama, at the moment, will slap a tariff on them faster than you can say WTO disagrees. When the WTO disagrees, they will allow another conjecture right away.

    No one has shown a shred of evidence for Chinese panel dumping. Nothing.

  • Vensonata

    Umm, didn’t the world trade organization just rule against the U.S. on this matter? The u.s. can appeal but whatever teeth the WTO has, are sunk into the American pv manufacturers butts.

    • Brian Donovan

      Yup, but the USA just refiled a new complaint.

      Obama’s donors insisted.

  • tibi stibi

    why do they make such a fuss about china subsidizing the transformation to cheap and green energy?

    • Bob_Wallace

      The issue is whether or not China used illegal methods to destroy foreign competitors.

      • tibi stibi

        yes i know and usually i would understand a more critical attitude but in this case its actually so that china is (or is not) helping use the get green.

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