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Published on June 26th, 2014 | by James Ayre

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Biggest Solar PV Project In Malaysia Now Online, Powered By Yingli Modules

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June 26th, 2014 by
 
The largest solar PV power plant in Malaysia — the 10 MW Gemas plant located in Negri Sembilan, and developed by Amcorp Power — was just recently commissioned and is now online.

The project — as recently announced by Yingli Green Energy — relies on more than 40,000 (10.3 MW worth) of Yingli solar modules for power generation, Yingli’s multicrystalline solar PV modules, to be specific. The Yingli solar modules are spread out over an area covering 13.7-hectares.

Logo_Yingli_Solar

The project will produce around 13.6 million kWh of electricity a year.

As stated before, the project was developed by Amcorp Power (subsidiary of the investment holding group Amcorp Group Berhad), in conjunction with Yingli Singapore, in turn a subsidiary of Yingli Green Energy Holding Company. (Arrangements like this via holding companies are very common in China.)

The development director of Yingli Singapore, Angie Koh, commented on the commissioning of the project: “We’re delighted to see that our products and services have fulfilled the requirements of Amcorp, an important partner of Yingli’s. We are proud of our contributions to their pioneering project, and believe that through further cooperation with leading players such as Amcorp Power, we will continue to grow our footprint in promising Southeast Asia.”

In related news, Yingli Green Energy is now, apparently, the third-biggest Chinese brand in Germany, according to a recent study undertaken by Huawei.

Falling only behind the telecommunications giant Huawei and the computer technology heavyweight Lenovo, Yingli is easily the biggest green tech company according to the research.

The results of the study — based on interviews with more than 2600 people — are interesting. Considering Yingli’s current place near the top of the solar pile, it’ll be interesting to see how much it can grow in the next few years.

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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • JamesWimberley

    Malaysia has a new renewable energy policy (link) with not terribly ambitious targets (11% by 2020) but, more important, a solid FIT incentive. It’s also become a major manufacturer (link) and exporter of solar modules, with factories for Panasonic, First Solar, Sunpower, and Hanwha Q-Cells among others. The fact that Yingli won a large contract without a manufacturing base suggests that Malaysia is not protectionist. A nice success story.

  • tibi stibi

    i wonder what the cost is

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