CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Batteries prepare adapt survive - flickr Matt Katzenberger

Published on June 26th, 2014 | by John Farrell

4

Distributed Renewable Energy Under Fire

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

June 26th, 2014 by
 

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , ,


About the Author

directs the Democratic Energy program at ILSR and he focuses on energy policy developments that best expand the benefits of local ownership and dispersed generation of renewable energy. His seminal paper, Democratizing the Electricity System, describes how to blast the roadblocks to distributed renewable energy generation, and how such small-scale renewable energy projects are the key to the biggest strides in renewable energy development.   Farrell also authored the landmark report Energy Self-Reliant States, which serves as the definitive energy atlas for the United States, detailing the state-by-state renewable electricity generation potential. Farrell regularly provides discussion and analysis of distributed renewable energy policy on his blog, Energy Self-Reliant States (energyselfreliantstates.org), and articles are regularly syndicated on Grist and Renewable Energy World.   John Farrell can also be found on Twitter @johnffarrell, or at jfarrell@ilsr.org.



  • Hans the elder

    It is weird that the country that often pushes free-market ideology down the throat of other countries still has these vertically integrated utilities with a state mandated monopoly. If utilities were split in a distribution and a retail part, and there was a free market for electricity retail, you would not have this problems.

  • Eric B.

    Add Massachusetts to the list… the utilities have been successful in arguing for the distribution fee to be taken out of the net-metering credit.

  • wattleberry

    For the latest UK take on the issue this morning’s BBC report is useful, discussing the concern about the ‘strike price’ to incentivise the distributables industry.
    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28041525

  • Matthew Pence

    It’s bullocks I tell you. If I get my energy for free. I should be allowed to distribute it or collect it for my lesiure or to those i want to share it with.

Back to Top ↑