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Clean Power Image Credit: Setouchi via Wikimedia Commons

Published on April 15th, 2014 | by James Ayre

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GE Financially Backing 230 MW Solar PV Power Plant In Japan

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GE Energy Financial Services — the energy arm of US conglomerate General Electric (GE) — recently announced that it will be financially backing a massive 230 MW solar PV power plant currently being slated to be constructed in the Japanese city of Setouchi.

The US-based GE is planning to invest between JPY 10-20 billion yen ($100-200 million) into the project — representing a substantial percentage of the total project costs of $777 million dollars. The Setouchi-based solar power project will be Japan’s largest once completed.

Image Credit: Setouchi via Wikimedia CommonsImage Credit: Setouchi via Wikimedia Commons

As the investment is for the running of the plant, it will grant GE a majority stake in the company that will operate the plant — Tokyo-based Kuni Umi Asset Management.

As it stands currently, the 230 MW Okayama Province based power plant is set to begin operations in 2018 — greatly boosting the solar energy capacity of the country at that point. The largest solar power plant now in operation in the country is a 70 MW installation located on the southern Japanese island of Kyushu.

The exact details of the deal are, of course, not completely clear yet, but GE Energy Financial Services did confirm that it will be an equity investment.

“Because documents about this project have been publicly disclosed by the Setouchi municipal assembly, we can confirm that if certain conditions are met, GE plans to invest in the solar power project,” GE spokesman Andy Katell told Reuters in an interview.

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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • Ronald Brakels

    At about $777 million the plant is embarrassingly expensive compared to Europe, the US, India, etc. And also lousy compared to Australia’s rooftop solar installation costs. However, there are good reasons to believe that the costs of solar will continue to fall in Japan. While land tends to be expensive in Japan there is no reason why they can’t install rooftop solar at German prices per watt, it just may take them a little time to get there.

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