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Published on March 16th, 2014 | by Zachary Shahan

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EV Market Share of European Countries (Charts)

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March 16th, 2014 by Zachary Shahan
 
I recently figured out electric vehicle market share for 17 European countries, the US, and Japan for an ABB Conversations article I wrote (full disclosure: I am compensated by ABB for articles written on that site). The results are very interesting, in my opinion, so I figured I’d drop the charts in here as well. There are three rankings—overall EV market share, 100%-electric market share, and plug-in hybrid market share. You can swing over to ABB Conversations for my commentary on these rankings. If you don’t care for my commentary (say what?!), you can just peruse the charts here:

And if you have an issue with the interactive charts above for some reason, here are static versions:

EV Market Share 2013

100 EV Market Share

PHEV Market Share 2013

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About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.



  • SirSparks

    So the USA is now in the EU ?.
    Great, a long needed change.

  • JamesWimberley

    It’s curious, if trivial, the Russia has a zero market share in pure evs and hybrids separately, but a tiny positive one when they are taken jointly.
    Most of the data is noise. In the low-sales countries, the numbers are so small that random variations will change the pecking order quite easily. The takeaway is that evs have achieved significant market share in just two countries, Norway and The Netherlands. The question is what makes them different from the rest – unique national conditions (culture, politics), or smallish differences in factors that also hold in other countries to different extents (like fuel taxes). If the latter, we can expect others to join them quite quickly.

    • Doug Cutler

      Norway has loads of cheap hydro, very high petrol costs and lots of tax breaks and other perks. Its still a special case (although also a warning to big oil if they raise prices at the pump too high.)

      Still, this is the type of “hockey stick” we do want, the shape of things to come in many more countries when the next gen batteries come on line in just a few years . . . except maybe for that rogue petro-state.

      Though not yet “significant” we might still consider EV sales in several other countries as important beach heads – Norways in the making.

  • Doug Cutler

    All rather encouraging, especially if you keep your eyes close to the top of the chart. Probably some rogue petro-state at the bottom but I’m not sure.

    I know the ever humble pedal-assist Ebike and electric scooter don’t get as much love around here but it might be worth noting that in China they’re selling about 20 million per year of those little guys. That’s a whole lotta miles traveled without internal combustion.

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